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Descendants of Seneca Howland

Generation No. 1

1.  SENECA8 HOWLAND  (CHARLES7, COOK6, JAMES5, NATHANIEL4, ZOETH3, HENRY2, HENRY1)1,2,3,4,5,6 was born February 12, 1780 in Beekman, Dutchess, New York7, and died July 26, 1831 in South Danby, Tompkins, New York8.  He married (1) MARY HAGERMAN in Dutchess county, New York.  She died March 17, 1806.  He married (2) AGNES KING9,10,11 December 14, 1806 in Ithaca, Tompkins, New York12,13, daughter of FRANCIS KING and MARY JONES.  She was born March 17, 1788 in New Jersey14,15, and died March 19, 1859 in South Danby, Tompkins, New York16.

Notes for SENECA HOWLAND:

It was nearly sunset on a day in the latter part of March, 1805.  The past winter had been severe and the snow yet lay on the ground to the depth of two feet or more.  From the top of Breeds Hill (the old Dug Road, near the southwestern corner of the Military Tract of New York State) might have been seen a newly-chopped road winding up through the woods, the stumps still sticking up through the snow and the logs hardly dragged aside far enough for a team of oxen to pass along.  The snow lay as deep here as elsewhere in the woods and was only beaten down into a narrow path by the boots of some footman who had gone down to Mr. Sheneck's at the Half Way House in the valley (later Morg. Whites) for a jug of "groceries".

Along this rough wood-road two yoke of oxen were slowly pulling a long sleigh up the steep hill that rose westward from the upper valley of the Catatonk creek.  On the sleigh were piled a few household goods and on them sat two young women, one carrying in her arms a baby seven months old and the other holding a little girl of two years.  The driver of the oxen, who tramped alongside was a young man of twenty-five, slim, straight and of medium height, his beardless face shaded by a heavy cap, beneath which looked out a pair of deep blue eyes.  His whole appearance betokened a long, hard journey.  Behind the sleight walked another young man of nineteen with an axe on his shoulder.

It is needless to say that the two men were Seneca Howland and his younger brother, James; while those in the sleigh were Seneca's wife, Polly Hagermann Howland and her sister, Betsy Hagerman with Seneca and Polly's two children, Levinah Anne (b. 2 Jan. 1803, d. 13 Sep 1805) and Charles Henry (b. 13 Aug 1804, d. 23 Sep 1805).  The family were coming from Fishkill in Duchess County, New York and were just arriving at their new home in the forest after a winter journey of some 250 miles through the Catskills and via Binghamton and Owego.

Seneca had been out the summer before and had chopped a small clearing in the woods and built a log house and barn.  There were at that time only three families in what was then called Haight's Settlement (later South Danby) - Old Haight on the Robinson farm (later known as the Hinds place); Old Nelson, on the Andrew Beer's place; and the Van Kleecks who lived on the flat-iron, as it was called, opposite the later Rankins place.  It took no small courage to bring a family to such a wild country at that time of year, but Seneca's early life had been such as to give him considerable self-reliance.

Seneca's father, Charles, a Quaker, was a wheelwright and he himself had learned that trade while young.  His first start in life, however, was obtained by delivering newspapers.  When about ten, he was hired as helper by a man who had a contract to deliver papers to the country about Fishkill.  In this way he earned $30.00 with which he bought a pony and thereafter carried on a considerable business of his own in delivering papers through the neighboring country.  Apparently, papers were not mailed to subscribers in those days but were sent to agents who undertook their delivery.  Seneca continued in the employment of one Nicolas Power until he was twenty years old, by which time he had saved the sum of 71.6.3, or $178.28.  Meanwhile, when time permitted, he also worked at his trade of Wheelwright and by the time he was twenty-one he owned a shop and five acres of land in Fishkill.  During the next four years he bought various other plots of ground and when, at the age of twenty-five, he moved with his wife and children to the frontier, he owned about twenty-four acres for which he had paid $615.50.

When he was twenty-one, Seneca had been appointed a constable of the township and, as the business of that office was considerable, he became fairly well known thereabouts.  In the village itself lived an old and aristocratic Dutch family, the Van Wycks.  Gen. John B. Van Wyck had recently acquired 6,000 acres of the old Watkins and Flint Purchase in south central New York, and needing someone to look after his interest there, offered the young constable the position on condition that he settle on the tract and act as Van Wyck's agent in the sale of the land to other settlers.

It was thus that the late winter and early spring of 1805 found Seneca moving out to the new country with his family and household goods.  With the help of his brother James, some land was cleared in time to sow crops that season.  But it is evident that his family never fully recovered from the hardships of the long journey through the winter snows of 1805. In the fall of that year his little daughter Levinah Anne, two and a half years old, died and ten days later his little son Charles Henry.  Nor was this all.  In the following winter his wife Polly succumbed to tuberculosis and died on the 17th of March, 1806, just a year from the time she came into the wilderness with her husband and children.   This left Seneca and his brother James alone, for his wife's sister, Betsy Hagerman, had gone back to Duchess Co., a month before Polly's death. But their work forced the two brothers to put all other thoughts aside. Seneca had taken up 400 acres of land and much new ground had to be cleared.  In the latter part of the summer of 1806 brother James, growing tired of the hardships of the frontier, also returned to Duchess County and Seneca was left entirely alone.  During that summer of 1806 he made one or more trips to the little village of Ithaca, and either coming or going (or both) had stopped at the tavern kept on South Hill, some three miles from Ithaca, by Francis King, a veteran of the Revolution who had taken up land here on the Military Tract.  At this tavern he had seen and been seen by the tavern keeper's daughter.  A story handed down in the family relates that when this 18 year old girl, Agnes, first saw the young widower she announced to her family that he was the man she was going to marry.   At any rate, she and Seneca Howland were married 14 Dec. 1806, nine months after his first wife's death.  Thus he obtained a companion in his loneliness and we acquired a grandmother.

Agnes King was a young woman of great energy and, I suspect from the reminiscences of my uncles and aunts, of a harsh and rather dictatorial character.  From the time of this marriage a new energy and thrift were give to Seneca's fortunes.  His new wife made him give up 200 acres of his land and devote himself to the improvement of the remaining 200.  His property in Duchess County had been sold the winter before by his father-in-law, Hendrick Hagermann, for 550 pounds, equivalent to $1,375.00; but a large part of the money went for the payment of old debts in that place, leaving but $500.00 to pay on his land in South Danby.  During the following winter (1806-7) Seneca visited his friends in Fishkill, the first of several visits made to his old home.

From the time of his second marriage until his death there were few events that varied the steady routine of work.  His son, Francis King Howland was born in September 1807 and from then until 1820 his family increased with great regularity and precision - eight children being born during the first twelve years of his second marriage and three other children thereafter.

In 1810 Seneca was elected Justice of the Peace, and ever afterwards was looked upon by his neighbors as a man who had profound knowledge of the law.  In fact, he was regularly re-elected to the office until his death.  In 1812 he was appointed Ensign of the 95th Regiment of the New York militia.  Five years later he was promoted to Captain.  Later, on the death of the Colonel, he was offered the Colonelcy of the regiment, but Agness would not allow him to accept the command, evidently thinking he had enough to do at home.

In 1827 he was confronted by a serious lawsuit.  Gen. Van Wyck gradually formed a dislike of his agent in Danby.  The two had maintained close business relations for twenty years, but their characters were wholly unlike.  Seneca was kind-hearted, rather easy-going man, not very prompt in doing business.  He had a habit of putting off disagreeable things, a habit not infrequently found in kind-hearted men.  On the other hand, Van Wyck was keen and grasping and insisted on the new settlers living up to the letter of their agreements.  If their payments fell the least in arrears, he kept writing to his agent to have them ejected at once from their holdings, but the latter was unwilling to proceed to such hard measures against his neighbors.  Old Mr. Bingham used to say, "Old Van Wyck would keep writing out 'Fire! Fire!' and Squire Howland would keep writing back 'Water! Water!'"

Thus, partly because of this, as well as because Seneca had not made any further payments on his own land since coming out to Danby, Gen. Van Wyck in 1824 revoked Seneca's power-of-attorney and appointed another man as agent.  He also charged Seneca with poor management and dishonesty; but it was not until 1827 that he brought suit against him the the State Supreme Court for $800.00, a sum he claimed owing him for lands sold by Howland during the latter's agency.  Grandfather brought forward a counterclaim against Van Wyck for $1,000.00 for improvements made on the latter's land, for taxes paid and surveys made thereon and for his own commissions of 4% on the lands sold.  The counter claims were finally left to three referees, who decided that "John B. Van Wyck was indebted to Seneca Howland the sum of $158.36", thus vindicating the latter from any charge of dishonesty.  But the pressure of the law suit together with Van Wyck's demand for final payment for his farm, forced Seneca in July, 1827 to borrow $600.00 for which he gave a mortgage on his land.  Four years later, at the time of his death, one-half of this mortgage had been paid off; but it was not until several years later that the remainder of the debt was discharged.

In 1829 Seneca was seized with a lameness in the knee which soon developed into what was then called the "white swelling" (later known as tuberculosis of the bone).  This was treated by Dr. Beers and Dr. Curtis, but their treatments were unavailing, and a "capping" of the swelling, is was said, scattered the disease into all parts of the body.  He died 26 July 1831, and such an impression had his life and abilities made on his neighbors that many years later a very old man told Arthur Charles Howland, Seneca's grandson, that "Old Squire Howland was smarter than any of his descendants."

More About SENECA HOWLAND:

Burial: Old Episcopal Cemetery, South Danby, Tompkins Co., New York17

More About AGNES KING:

Burial: Old Episcopal Cemetery, South Danby, Tompkins Co., New York17

Children of SENECA HOWLAND and MARY HAGERMAN are:

                   i.    LEVINIA ANNE9 HOWLAND, b. January 02, 1803, Fishkill, Dutchess county, New York; d. September 13, 1805, South Danby, Tompkin county, New York.

More About LEVINIA ANNE HOWLAND:

Burial: South Danby, Tompkin county, New York

                  ii.    CHARLES HENRY HOWLAND, b. August 13, 1804, Fishkill, Dutchess county, New York; d. September 23, 1805, South Danby, Tompkin county, New York.

More About CHARLES HENRY HOWLAND:

Burial: South Danby, Tompkin county, New York

Children of SENECA HOWLAND and AGNES KING are:

2.              iii.    FRANCIS KING9 HOWLAND, b. September 15, 1807, South Danby, Tompkins, New York; d. March 05, 1878, South Danby, Tompkins, New York.

                 iv.    DR. JOHN HOWLAND18,19, b. March 01, 1809, South Danby, Tompkins, New York20; d. April 15, 1836, South Danby, Tompkins Co., New York.

Notes for DR. JOHN HOWLAND:

John never married.  He went to medical school -- "Hamilton" College -- started practice in Owego and died of small-pox, contracted from a patient in 1836.  He was 26 years old when he died.

More About DR. JOHN HOWLAND:

Burial: Old Episcopal Cemetery, South Danby, Tompkins Co., New York

Cause of Death: Small-pox

Education: Hamilton College

                  v.    CAROLINE HOWLAND20, b. March 14, 1811, South Danby, Tompkins, New York20.

Notes for CAROLINE HOWLAND:

They had 11 children, nine died in infancy and only two grew up.

3.              vi.    JAMES K. HOWLAND, b. March 08, 1812, South Danby, Tompkins Co., New York; d. March 04, 1888, South Danby, Tompkins Co., New York.

4.             vii.    HARRIET AMANDA HOWLAND, b. January 04, 1814, South Danby, Tompkins, New York; d. July 05, 1890, Candor, New York.

               viii.    LAVINIA ANN HOWLAND20,21, b. January 02, 1816, South Danby, Tompkins, New York22; d. July 15, 1853, South Danby, Tompkins, New York; m. JOHN MANNING, December 13, 1848, South Danby, Tompkins co., New York.

More About LAVINIA ANN HOWLAND:

Burial: Danby Episcopal Hill Cemetery (Peter Rd.), Danby, Tompkins Co., New York

Notes for JOHN MANNING:

John Manning was a farmer in Danby, New York.   He and his wife left no children.  They belonged to the Methodist church in S. Danby.

5.               ix.    CHARLES HOWLAND, b. January 13, 1818, South Danby, Tompkins, New York; d. May 24, 1900, South Danby, Tompkins, New York.

6.                x.    REV. SENECA HOWLAND, b. December 20, 1819, South Danby, Tompkins Co., New York; d. January 12, 1906, Smyrna, New York..

7.               xi.    WILLIAM HOWLAND, b. March 21, 1827, South Danby, Tompkins, New York; d. July 18, 1907, South Danby, Tompkins, New York.

8.              xii.    MARY JANE HOWLAND, b. October 30, 1828, South Danby, Tompkins, New York; d. September 22, 1900.

Generation No. 2

2.  FRANCIS KING9 HOWLAND (SENECA8, CHARLES7, COOK6, JAMES5, NATHANIEL4, ZOETH3, HENRY2, HENRY1)22,23,24 was born September 15, 1807 in South Danby, Tompkins, New York25, and died March 05, 1878 in South Danby, Tompkins, New York.  He married CLARISSA CASTERLINE26,27,28 September 20, 1827 in Danby, Tompkins Co., New York, daughter of JOSEPH CASTERLINE and MARGARET ATKINSON.  She was born October 11, 1808 in Newfield, Tompkins Co., New York29, and died February 10, 1888 in South Danby, Tompkins Co., New York29.

Notes for FRANCIS KING HOWLAND:

He was raised to follow his father's profession of farming, but later took up milling.  He was a large, powerful man.  In the 1850 census he is listed as a farmer in Danby, New York age 43.  His wife "Claurisa age 42 is there and is said to be born in NJ.  The farm is valued at $1,600.00. The children listed are:  Seneca, age 16; Levi, age 14; Edgar, age 12; Terrisa, age 8; Charles, age 20; Joseph, age 18; and Agnes, age 1.

Arthur C. Howland wrote of uncle Frank and aunt Clara: "I can just remember Uncle Frank and Aunt Clara.  She finally became insane, intermittently wild, at other times apparently normal.  She was blind when I knew her."

More About FRANCIS KING HOWLAND:

Baptism: Methodist

Burial: South Danby Cemetery, South Danby, Tompkins Co., New York29

Occupation: Farmer and miller

Notes for CLARISSA CASTERLINE:

The 1850 census suggests that Francis K. Howland's wife Claurisa age 42 was born in N.J. and not in New York.

According to the 1880 census, Clarissa was living with her daughter and son in law, Lewis Ferris in that year.

More About CLARISSA CASTERLINE:

Burial: South Danby Cemetery, South Danby, Tompkins Co., New York29

Children of FRANCIS HOWLAND and CLARISSA CASTERLINE are:

9.                i.    CHARLES CASTERLINE10 HOWLAND, b. January 16, 1830, South Danby, Tompkins, New York; d. December 25, 1900, Minneaplis, Minnesota.

10.             ii.    SENECA HOWLAND, b. May 09, 1834, Tompkins co., New York; d. February 12, 1901, Forest City, Winnebago, Iowa.

11.            iii.    LEVI M. HOWLAND, b. March 19, 1836, Danby, Tompkins Co., New York; d. Missouri.

12.            iv.    EDGAR VOSE HOWLAND, b. May 19, 1838, Danby, Tompkins Co., New York.

                  v.    JOHN J. HOWLAND30,31, b. May 06, 184032,33; d. March 19, 1861, Danby, Tompkins Co., New York34.

13.            vi.    THERESA HOWLAND, b. December 10, 1841; d. February 17, 1888.

14.           vii.    GEORGE F. HOWLAND, b. October 10, 1844, South Danby, Tompkins, New York.

               viii.    MARY A. HOWLAND35, b. August 29, 184736; m. (1) NEAL THOMPSON, June 03, 1874; d. Florida; m. (2) ODEL KNAPP, Aft. 1875, Conn..

Notes for MARY A. HOWLAND:

Mary A. Howland moved to Wisconsin where she was married to Neal Thompson, a merchant.  From here they moved to Florida where Mr. Thompson died.  After his death she went to Connecticut and then married Odel Knapp.

15.             ix.    AGNES C. HOWLAND, b. March 23, 1849.

3.  JAMES K.9 HOWLAND (SENECA8, CHARLES7, COOK6, JAMES5, NATHANIEL4, ZOETH3, HENRY2, HENRY1)37,38,38 was born March 08, 1812 in South Danby, Tompkins Co., New York39,40, and died March 04, 1888 in South Danby, Tompkins Co., New York41.  He married EMOLINE MANDERVILLE41 April 08, 184142.  She was born 181543, and died July 1874 in South Danby, Tompkins Co., New York44.

Notes for JAMES K. HOWLAND:

In the 1850 census Emma is listed as Emery E age 3.  All are born in New York.  Their farm is valued at $750.00.

More About JAMES K. HOWLAND:

Burial: Manderville Cemetery (Danby, Nelson Rd.), Danby, Tompkins County, New York

More About EMOLINE MANDERVILLE:

Burial: Manderville Cemetery (Danby, Nelson Rd.), Danby, Tompkins County, New York

Children of JAMES HOWLAND and EMOLINE MANDERVILLE are:

16.              i.    HARRIET ADELAIDE10 HOWLAND, b. May 24, 1842.

17.             ii.    WILLIAM A. HOWLAND, b. August 23, 1844; d. Danby, Tompkins Co., New York.

18.            iii.    EMMA HOWLAND, b. January 11, 1848.

                 iv.    DR. LYMAN E. HOWLAND44,45, b. April 17, 185046; d. December 29, 187447; m. MARY; b. 1855; d. 1875.

Notes for DR. LYMAN E. HOWLAND:

He studied medicine and died just as he began practice.

More About DR. LYMAN E. HOWLAND:

Burial: Manderville Cemetery (Danby, Nelson Rd.), Danby, Tompkins County, New York

Occupation: Physician

More About MARY:

Burial: Manderville Cemetery (Danby, Nelson Rd.), Danby, Tompkins County, New York

                  v.    MARY E. HOWLAND47,48, b. June 14, 1855, South Danby, Tompkins County, New York49,50; d. May 07, 1875, South Danby, Tompkins County, New York51.

More About MARY E. HOWLAND:

Burial: Manderville Cemetery (Danby, Nelson Rd.), Danby, Tompk

19.            vi.    ELLA T. HOWLAND, b. November 08, 1856, New York.

4.  HARRIET AMANDA9 HOWLAND (SENECA8, CHARLES7, COOK6, JAMES5, NATHANIEL4, ZOETH3, HENRY2, HENRY1)52,53,54,55,56 was born January 04, 1814 in South Danby, Tompkins, New York57,58,59, and died July 05, 1890 in Candor, New York.  She married WILLIAM W. WILLSEY60,61 March 23, 1842, son of JACOB WILLSEY and SARAH HALL.  He was born Abt. 1818 in New York62,63, and died September 12, 1874 in Wilseyville, Tompkins co., New York.

Notes for WILLIAM W. WILLSEY:

The 1860 census shows Martha Barto, aslo living in the house. 

Maple Grove Cemetery, Candor, New York

Willsey          William W.    9/12/1874       66y 6m   

Willsey H. Amanda    7/6/1890         76y 6m    wife of Wm. W

Children of HARRIET HOWLAND and WILLIAM WILLSEY are:

20.              i.    MARIA A.10 WILLSEY, b. November 14, 1849.

                  ii.    SARAH A. WILLSEY64,65,66,67, b. November 30, 185168,69.

Notes for SARAH A. WILLSEY:

Sarah never married.  She was afflicted with asthma her entire life.

5.  CHARLES9 HOWLAND (SENECA8, CHARLES7, COOK6, JAMES5, NATHANIEL4, ZOETH3, HENRY2, HENRY1)70,71,72,73 was born January 13, 1818 in South Danby, Tompkins, New York74,75, and died May 24, 1900 in South Danby, Tompkins, New York.  He married MARIA ALIDA BASSETT76,77 November 27, 1850 in Seymour, Conn78, daughter of JOSIAH BASSETT and BETSEY BASSETT.  She was born January 20, 1826 in Connecticut79, and died May 16, 1901 in South Danby, Tompkins, New York.

Notes for CHARLES HOWLAND:

Charles Howland was born in 1818 and was on of six children.  Charles was Justice of the Peace in South Danby and people came to him to settle their complaints and grievances against their neighbors, arguments over property lines, etc.  Aunt Mary told Emily Hinton Howland that she and Arthur Charles Howland, as young children, would be sent out of the room at these times.  However, they would go up stairs and peek through a hole in the bedroom floor down into the room below.  They must have learned a lot about life and human nature.  Charles had  a farm in South Danby, Tompkins county, New York.  He and his wife are buried in the cemetery near by.

Charles Howland was a man of slight build and he had probably strained himself with the hard work on the farm at the time he died in 1900.

More About CHARLES HOWLAND:

Burial: Danby Episcopal Hill Cemetery (Peter Rd.), Danby, Tompkins Co., New York

Notes for MARIA ALIDA BASSETT:

Maria Alida Bassett married Charles Howland on 27 Nov. 1850 in Seymour, Conn.  She was a plain woman in appearance, though not in character.  She was known for her quiet efficiency and skill and for never losing her head in an emergency.  She was often summoned from quite a distance to attend women in child-birth; and Charles Howland recalled anxious men waking them in the middle of the night and taking his mother with them to attend their wives.  His father would drive over the next day or the day after to bring her home.  Maria never lost any of these babies at birth, or did their mothers fail to come through the ordeal.

More About MARIA ALIDA BASSETT:

Burial: Danby Episcopal Hill Cemetery (Peter Rd.), Danby, Tompkins Co., New York

Children of CHARLES HOWLAND and MARIA BASSETT are:

21.              i.    RUFUS BASSETT10 HOWLAND, b. September 15, 1851, South Danby, Tompkins, New York; d. July 1923.

                  ii.    ELIZABETH REYNOLDS HOWLAND80,81, b. March 12, 1866, South Danby, Tompkins, New York82; d. November 23, 1953, Trumansburg, Tompkins, New York.

Notes for ELIZABETH REYNOLDS HOWLAND:

Great Aunt Elizabeth was a small and very quiet woman, but every now and then she would peak up and make a very funny and fitting comment on the conversation much amusing the family.  Like the rest of the family, she attended Wyoming Seminary.

Like the rest of the family, she attended Wyoming Seminary.  Once, at a meeting of the Ladies Aid Society (of the Methodist Church), the pastor made some slighting remark about Aunt Mary indicating that she had not been quite honest in the handling of the Society's money, of which she was treasurer.  Immediately, Aunt Elizabeth rose to her sister's defense and told the minister off in no uncertain terms.   Later, hen this was reported in the family, much to everyone's delight Aunt Eliabeth said in a shocked voice, "Did I say that?!"

After the death of Rufus' wife, Aunt Elizabeth kept house for Rufus and raised Susan.  Elizbeth was known for her excellent butter which was never rancid (she kept the churn clean).  She was able to earn about $100 a year selling her butter.  After Rufus' death, Elizabeth and Susan remained in the Trumansburg house.  One night when she was an old lady she got up and may have grown dizzy as she fell down the stairs.  From then on she was bed ridden and appeared not to know anyone.  Susan took loving gentle care of her until her death in 1953.

22.            iii.    ARTHUR CHARLES HOWLAND, b. December 24, 1869, South Danby, Tompkins, New York; d. March 29, 1952, Swarthmore, Delaware, Pennsylvania.

                 iv.    MARY LOUISA HOWLAND83, b. March 04, 1872, South Danby, Tompkins, New York; d. December 17, 1958, Trumansburg, Tompkins, New York; m. GEORGE VAN KLEECK, December 28, 1903, Tompkins co., New York; b. October 27, 1871; d. December 05, 1943, Candor, Tompkins, New York.

Notes for MARY LOUISA HOWLAND:

As  young woman, Aunt Mary was very pretty with deep blue eyes and curly hair.   When her brother, Arthur, left home for college and thereafter permanently, she stayed home and looked after her parents until their deaths in 1900 and 1901.  Then the first year after Arthur's marriage to Emily Wycoff Berry,  Mary lived with them in New York City (1902-03).

In 1903 or 1904 Mary married George Van Kleck.  The Van Kleecks were among the early settlers of the South Danby area.  George had a farm in Dry Brook, a few miles from the Howland farm.  As a farmer's wife, Aunt Mary worked very hard, helping with the chores as well as caring for the house, cooking, etc.  She told me Uncle George was kind and gentle with his animals and helped them at birthing.  They had no children which was sad because Aunt Mary loved children.  They eventually sold the farm in Dry Brook and moved to a brick house on the outskirts of Candor.  This was a smaller farm but the work was the same.

Aunt Mary was a great story teller and delighted in telling the stories passed down in the family about the life in the rural community.  Farm houses were all a mile or more apart, but everyone knew their neighbors and the kind of people they were.  Social life centered in the church--that is all there was--no phones, no radios, no TV and a 12 mile drive with horse and wagon to Ithaca, the nearest city.  One of the neighbors had a run down farm with nothing cared for or looked after. Aunt Mary told me, that when one of the family died, she went over to help the family prepare for the funeral and for any visitors who might come in.  The house was so dirty she had to scrape the floors with a hoe to get them clean.  It was said of this place that the cockroaches were so big they came out of the house in the morning and sat on the fence and crowed.

After Uncle George's death, Aunt Mary sold the Candor place and went to live with her sister, Elizabeth, and niece, Susan, in Trumansburg.

Notes for GEORGE VAN KLEECK:

George Van Kleek had a sister named Jean van Kleek.  She worked in New York City and never married.  There was also a Neice by the name of Ruth Miller who lived in Ithaca, probably in the 1950's.  This is all my mother could remember of the Van Kleecks.

More About GEORGE VAN KLEECK:

Burial: Maple Grove Cemetery, Candor, New York

6.  REV. SENECA9 HOWLAND (SENECA8, CHARLES7, COOK6, JAMES5, NATHANIEL4, ZOETH3, HENRY2, HENRY1)84,85,86,87 was born December 20, 1819 in South Danby, Tompkins Co., New York88,89, and died January 12, 1906 in Smyrna, New York..  He married (1) MARIANNE CLARK Abt. 1843, daughter of REV. LABAN CLARK.  She was born Abt. 1819 in Middletown, Conn.90, and died July 03, 1853.  He married (2) JULIA HUSTED REYNOLDS91 April 20, 1858 in Greenwich, Conn., daughter of ARD REYNOLDS and ANNE DUELL.  She was born March 10, 1827 in Greenwich, Conn., and died March 12, 1890 in Stanwich, Conn..

Notes for REV. SENECA HOWLAND:

Seneca prepared for college at Cazenorra studied at Wesleyan University and after leaving here traveled in Europe.   He joined the N.Y. East Conference and has been stationed at many of the important charges within its jurisdiction such as: Waterbury, Mount-Vernon, Merriden, Seymour, Greenwich and New York City.  He married Marianne, the daughter of Laban Clark, DD. one of the founders of Wesleyan University with whom he lived for five years until her death.  He was married a second time to Julia H., daughter of Hon. ___ Reynolds of Greenwich, Conn.  They have three children: 1) Francis A. Howland who has attended school at the Wyoming Seminary and at Cajerovia.  Francis is married to Josephine Smith of Islip, Long Island and has two children.  He is a merchant.  2) Laban C. Howland is a mechanic in New York City; and, 3) Agnes is at her home.

Obit of Seneca Howland, from the Greenwich News, Friday, January 19, 1906

Rev. Seneca Howland, a former resident of this place and at two different times pastor of the methodist church here, died at Smyrna, NY, Jan. 12th, age 86 years and 23 days.  He was stricken with paralysis Oct 3d, while conducting services at that place.  The remains were interred in the family plot here on Monday.  Mr. Howland leaves three children, Frank A., of Islip, L.I.; Laban C. of New York city; and Agnes, of New Jersey.

In 1860, it is noted that Seneca Howland had a particularly large property value.  In the 1860 census, it is noted that Mary O'Brian, age 27 was working as a servant on the farm.  She was from Ireland.  Also there were two farm hands, Jarves J. Hull, age 35 and Haugh Sullivan, age 16.

More About REV. SENECA HOWLAND:

Burial: 1906, Stanwich, Conn.

Degree: Cazenovia Seminary, N.Y.

Ordination: Methodist Minister N/Y. East Conference

Residence: 1870, Greenwich, Fairfield, Connecticut

More About JULIA HUSTED REYNOLDS:

Burial: 1890

Property: August 15, 1860, Greenwich, Conn. property valued at $14, 000.92

Child of SENECA HOWLAND and MARIANNE CLARK is:

                   i.    GEORGE S.10 HOWLAND93, b. Abt. 184494.

Children of SENECA HOWLAND and JULIA REYNOLDS are:

23.             ii.    FRANCIS ARD10 HOWLAND, b. April 18, 1859, Greenwich, Conn..

                 iii.    JOHN REYNOLDS HOWLAND95, b. August 05, 1861, Greenwich, Connecticut; d. May 15, 1865, Greenwich, Connecticut96.

Notes for JOHN REYNOLDS HOWLAND:

Son of Rev. Seneca Howland d. May 15, 1865, age 3 years, 9 months and 10 days.

24.            iv.    LABAN CLARK HOWLAND, b. January 05, 1864.

                  v.    SARAH AGNES HOWLAND97,98, b. August 16, 1867; d. March 13, 1955.

                 vi.    JULIA HARRIET HOWLAND99, b. May 22, 1870; d. July 12, 1870.

7.  WILLIAM9 HOWLAND (SENECA8, CHARLES7, COOK6, JAMES5, NATHANIEL4, ZOETH3, HENRY2, HENRY1)100,101,102,103 was born March 21, 1827 in South Danby, Tompkins, New York104,105, and died July 18, 1907 in South Danby, Tompkins, New York.  He married LOUISE M. LORING106,107 April 09, 1851.  She was born July 21, 1826 in Spencer, New York108,109, and died June 15, 1907 in South Danby, Tompkins, New York.

More About WILLIAM HOWLAND:

Burial: South Danby Cemetery, South Danby, Tompkins Co., New York110

More About LOUISE M. LORING:

Burial: South Danby Cemetery, South Danby, Tompkins Co., New York110

Children of WILLIAM HOWLAND and LOUISE LORING are:

                   i.    FREDERICK10 HOWLAND111, b. September 03, 1856, South Danby, Tompkins, New York112; d. February 07, 1860, South Danby, Tompkins, New York112.

More About FREDERICK HOWLAND:

Burial: South Danby Cemetery, South Danby, Tompkins Co., New York112

                  ii.    LOUISA M. HOWLAND112, b. 1857, South Danby, Tompkins Co., New York112; d. February 07, 1860, South Danby, Tompkins Co., New York112.

More About LOUISA M. HOWLAND:

Burial: South Danby Cemetery, South Danby, Tompkins Co., New York112

                 iii.    HARRIET L. HOWLAND113,114, b. April 11, 1861, Danby, Tompkins Co., New York115,116; d. 1950, Wilseyville, New York117.

                 iv.    ADDIE L. HOWLAND118,119,120, b. May 01, 1865, Danby, Tompkins Co., New York121,122; d. 1948, Wilseyville, New York123.

More About ADDIE L. HOWLAND:

Burial: Old Rural Danby Cemetery, Danby, Tompkins County, New York123

8.  MARY JANE9 HOWLAND (SENECA8, CHARLES7, COOK6, JAMES5, NATHANIEL4, ZOETH3, HENRY2, HENRY1)124,125 was born October 30, 1828 in South Danby, Tompkins, New York126, and died September 22, 1900.  She married CLARK LOUNDSBURY February 06, 1849.  He was born 1818, and died November 07, 1900.

Children of MARY HOWLAND and CLARK LOUNDSBURY are:

                   i.    CORNELIA10 LOUNDSBURY, b. October 10, 1860.

Notes for CORNELIA LOUNDSBURY:

She was a school teacher at Cortland, New York.

                  ii.    HARRIOT A. LOUNDSBURY, b. June 06, 1863, Tioga Center, Tioga Co., New York.

Notes for HARRIOT A. LOUNDSBURY:

She was a school teacher in Cortland, New York.

Generation No. 3

9.  CHARLES CASTERLINE10 HOWLAND (FRANCIS KING9, SENECA8, CHARLES7, COOK6, JAMES5, NATHANIEL4, ZOETH3, HENRY2, HENRY1)127,128,129 was born January 16, 1830 in South Danby, Tompkins, New York130,131, and died December 25, 1900 in Minneaplis, Minnesota132.  He married (1) ELVIRA HOWE133 August 13, 1853 in Tompkins co., New York133.  She was born March 27, 1834 in New York, and died October 06, 1875 in Garner, Hancock co., Iowa.  He married (2) ELEANOR VAN ETTEN Aft. October 06, 1875, daughter of SIMON VAN ETTEN and MARY MARSHALL.  She was born February 15, 1840 in Corning, Steubens County, New York, and died September 08, 1941 in Bloomington, Minnesota.

Notes for ELEANOR VAN ETTEN:

At sometime after marriage Eleanor moved to Minnesota. Pg. 170, Van Ettens in   America has a memo of newspaper clipping stating she was residing Minnesota   Masonic Home at Bloomington, near Minneapolis.

Eleanor also was a signer on the first petition sent to Washington requesting Women's suffrage.

Mrs. Eleanor Howland, sister of the Bellingham resident, is the only living charter member of this organization. The first meeting of the Order of the Eastern Star was held in Corning, New York in 1857. Mrs. Howland is now 97 years of age and resides at the Minnesota Masonic Homme at Bloomington, near Minneapolis.

Mrs. Howland has been a visitor to Bellingham on several occasions. Besides the honor of the charter member of the fraternal order she prides herself with signing the first petition sent to Washington requesting women's

suffrage more than three-quarters of a century ago."

Eleanor Howland became a resident of Minnesota Masonic Home 29 May 1926. The Home opened in 1920 and Eleanor was their 41st resident.  At that time she was 86.  The homes records show she was born in Corning, New York,  15 February, 1840.  Her address at time of admit was 5802 Pleasant Avenue, Minneapolis.  She was a member of Palestine Chapter No. 112 Minneapolis.  Her occupation is listed "Charity Worker."  Relatives are listed as a daughter, Mrs. William Blair of St. Paul.  Date of Death: 8 Sep 1941 at the age of 101.  A note in her file states "Funeral services for "Grandma" Howland were held at the Joe Billman Mortuary "House of Flowers" 2121 Nicollet Avenue, Minneapolis, Thursday, 11 Sep 1941 at 2:00 P.M.  The Rev. M.W. McGladery officiating.  Eastern Star Services by Palestine Chapter 112 of O.E.S. Minneapolis."

Children of CHARLES HOWLAND and ELVIRA HOWE are:

                   i.    MARY FRANCES11 HOWLAND134, b. September 29, 1855, Tompkins co., New York134; d. 1953, South Dakota134; m. BURNER134.

Notes for MARY FRANCES HOWLAND:

Mary Francis was always known in the family as aunt Frank to her family. It was not noted in the family records as to if she ever had children.

                  ii.    HIRAM SENECA HOWLAND134, b. December 12, 1857, West Bend, Iowa134; d. December 10, 1936, Mitchel, South Dakota134; m. LUCINDA DEWITT; b. March 29, 1860; d. June 03, 1892.

                 iii.    CHARLES ALBERT HOWLAND134, b. October 1858134; d. October 22, 1859134.

                 iv.    INA DELPHINE HOWLAND135, b. January 19, 1861, Tompkins co., New York136; d. December 1917136; m. JAMES D. DELOSH137, September 20, 1880, Garner, Hancock co., Iowa138; b. , Luni, Iowa138.

                  v.    CHARLES ONO HOWLAND139, b. November 19, 1868139; d. May 15, 1936, South Dakota139.

Notes for CHARLES ONO HOWLAND:

Charles O. Howland never married according to the Obit.  It stated that he came to Lyman county in the spring of 1870 with his parents.  Leaves brother, H. S. Howland (Hiram Seneca), Mary Burner and Alta Foley.  His sister, Mrs. J. H. Delosh preceded him in death 18 years ago.    Also survived by two nieces; Mary Shirk and Mrs. Frank Kennedy.

According to Virgil Kennedy, Charles Ona had three passions: poker, whiskey, and cooking.  For a time he worked for the railroad up on the Platte River cooking for a tressel crew.   Presumably after he cleaned them out at cards, he moved on and cooked at a feed lot.  She staked a claim which her worked while supporting him self at cards.  He also took up carving canes from the Diamond Willows which are exceedingly handsome.  Virgil has one of the canes.  The Diamond Willow gets its name from the diamond pattern when a wasp lays its eggs in the bark.

Charles O. Howland was in Jones County in 1910.

                 vi.    ALTA IVA HOWLAND139, b. June 22, 1871, Garner, Hancock County, Iowa; d. April 27, 1961, Renwick, Iowa; m. STEWART BERNE FOLEY, December 19, 1886, Hardy, Humbolt County, Iowa; b. Humbolt County, Iowa..

Notes for ALTA IVA HOWLAND:

Alta Iva Howland was fifteen when she married.  She had nine children , one of which died young.  she always ate backs of chickens and in later years was asked why by a grandson.  She answered, "That way everyone got a piece of chicken."  When she was very young her family traveled to South Dakota and back by covered wagon.    She met her husband to be after they came to Iowa.  Their first child was Bessie, who was raised by some of the family because the couple were both so young when Bessie was born.

Notes for STEWART BERNE FOLEY:

Stewart Foley was the first white male born in Humbolt county, Iowa.  He grew up working on farms and had a close encounter with Indians, but only lost his hat.  Also he used to go to the fairs and take on wrestling to earn extra money.  He married when he was seventeen years old., his wife was fifteen.  He always called his wife Mither in later years.  He loved to tease if he had a chance.

Copy of marriage certificate obtained from FHL Number 1401932, Stewert Berne Foley, age 22 & Alta Iva Howland age 15, married Hardy, Iowa, recorded Humbolt, Humbolt County, Iowa Dec 19, 1886 from the 1885-1900 records.

10.  SENECA10 HOWLAND (FRANCIS KING9, SENECA8, CHARLES7, COOK6, JAMES5, NATHANIEL4, ZOETH3, HENRY2, HENRY1)140,141,142 was born May 09, 1834 in Tompkins co., New York143,144, and died February 12, 1901 in Forest City, Winnebago, Iowa.  He married SARAH ELIZABETH ELIZA GILLESPIE145 September 20, 1862.  She was born February 17, 1839 in St. Lawrence, New York146, and died November 08, 1899 in Forest City, Winnebago, Iowa.

Notes for SENECA HOWLAND:

According to the Franklyn Howland book, Seneca moved to Wisconsin.

Children of SENECA HOWLAND and SARAH GILLESPIE are:

                   i.    ANNA AGNES11 HOWLAND, b. March 01, 1869, Wisconsin; d. April 01, 1961, Mason City, Cerro Gordo, Iowa; m. GEORGE WILLIAM PALMER, April 03, 1889, Ellington Center, Hancock co., Iowa/Hancock Co., IA147; b. January 20, 1866, Sauk, Wisconsin; d. April 29, 1948, Mason City, Cerro Gordo, Iowa.

                  ii.    FLORA M. HOWLAND, b. January 05, 1872.

                 iii.    MAUDE M. HOWLAND, b. May 28, 1877, Ellington Township, Hancock co, Iowa/Hancock, Pottawattamie Co., IA; d. June 29, 1954, Forest City, Winnebago, Iowa; m. HENRY HANSON, September 16, 1903, Forest City, Winnebago co., Iowa; b. June 02, 1878, Forest City, Winnebago, Iowa; d. September 08, 1944, Forest City, Winnebago, Iowa.

                 iv.    ADELADE MALISSA HOWLAND, b. January 05, 1879, Ellington Township, Hancock co., Iowa/; d. September 08, 1952, Forest City, Winnebago, Iowa.

                  v.    RAY HOWLAND, b. Abt. 1889.

11.  LEVI M.10 HOWLAND (FRANCIS KING9, SENECA8, CHARLES7, COOK6, JAMES5, NATHANIEL4, ZOETH3, HENRY2, HENRY1)148,149 was born March 19, 1836 in Danby, Tompkins Co., New York150,151,152, and died in Missouri.  He married MARIA LUCRETIA RAMSDELL153,154 December 26, 1860 in Lincoln County, Missouri155, daughter of MARY.  She was born December 26, 1845 in Missouri155,156, and died Bef. 1910157.

Notes for LEVI M. HOWLAND:

Levi was a harness-maker, and moved to Missouri before the civil war.  He was reputed to be "a rampant copperhead during the war."  Franklyn Howland reports that he had six children in his book on the Howland but does not name them.  I have found several names in a Casterline genealogy, but no source is cited and I do not know how accurate the information is.

In 1880, Levi and his wife were living in Columbia, Boone, Missouri.  The initials for the first two children appear to validate the names in the Casterline genealogy.  Additional names are found in the 1880 census. In the 1880 census Levi is listed as L.M. Howland. Levi is identified as a harness maker.

Levi M. Howland is found in the 1910 census, age 73.  He is living in the 6th Ward Kansas, Jackson County, Missouri.  He may be found in series T624, Roll 786, Part 1, Page 174-A.

More About LEVI M. HOWLAND:

Occupation: Harness Maker

Notes for MARIA LUCRETIA RAMSDELL:

The 1880 census cites her only as L. M. Howland - wife age 33.

Children of LEVI HOWLAND and MARIA RAMSDELL are:

                   i.    FLORA11 HOWLAND158, b. June 15, 1862, Lincoln county, Missouri/Lincoln Co., MO158.

                  ii.    JAMES HOWLAND158, b. January 27, 1865, Lincoln county, Missouri/Lincoln Co., MO158.

                 iii.    MARY HOWLAND159, b. Abt. 1871160.

                 iv.    FRANK HOWLAND160, b. January 1874, Columbia, Boone, Missouri160,161; m. HELEN161, 1891, Missiouri161; b. September 1876, Missouri.

Notes for FRANK HOWLAND:

I have assumed that he was born in Columbia, Boone Co, Missouri

More About FRANK HOWLAND:

Occupation: 1900, Saloon Keeper161

                  v.    CARRIE HOWLAND162, b. Abt. 1877, Missouri162,163,163,163; m. WILLIAM G. NELSON163; b. 1875, Scotland163.

Notes for CARRIE HOWLAND:

They were living at 703 East 5th Street, Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri in 1910.  At that time they had been married three years.  There were no children listed in this census.

More About WILLIAM G. NELSON:

Occupation: 1910, Collector

                 vi.    ELIZIBETH HOWLAND164, b. Abt. 1879164.

12.  EDGAR VOSE10 HOWLAND (FRANCIS KING9, SENECA8, CHARLES7, COOK6, JAMES5, NATHANIEL4, ZOETH3, HENRY2, HENRY1)165,166,167,168 was born May 19, 1838 in Danby, Tompkins Co., New York169,170.  He married FANNETTE LEGG171,172 September 11, 1861173.  She was born December 09, 1841173,174.

Notes for EDGAR VOSE HOWLAND:

Edgar V. Howland was a dealer in live stock and lived in Ithaca, New York.  In the 1870 census, he is listed as a butcher.  He is age 35, and is wife is age 32.  There were no childeren listed at that time.  His wife's name is written at Nettie.

Children of EDGAR HOWLAND and FANNETTE LEGG are:

                   i.    HARRY B.11 HOWLAND175, b. September 13, 1870176; m. ALICE177, 1905177; b. Abt. 1888, New York177.

Notes for HARRY B. HOWLAND:

Harry B. Howland was married at age 35.  His wife Alice, was 24.    Harry is listed as age 48 and Alice is listed as 42.

More About HARRY B. HOWLAND:

Occupation: 1930, Employed as a janitor in a private home per the 1930 census

Notes for ALICE:

Alice's parents were both born in Pennsylvania according to the 1930 census.

                  ii.    KATHERINE B. HOWLAND178,179, b. July 28, 1876, New York180,181,181.

Notes for KATHERINE B. HOWLAND:

Katherine is not shown as to have been working at of 1900.  However, she could read and write per the census.

13.  THERESA10 HOWLAND (FRANCIS KING9, SENECA8, CHARLES7, COOK6, JAMES5, NATHANIEL4, ZOETH3, HENRY2, HENRY1)182,183,184 was born December 10, 1841185,186, and died February 17, 1888187.  She married LEWIS FERRIS188,189 June 16, 1862190.  He was born July 05, 1838191.

Notes for THERESA HOWLAND:

Teresa married Lewis Ferris a farmer.  Of their three children, Charles has attended the high school at Ithaca and traveled in the west; Clara is a teacher and Floyd is still a child at home.

More About THERESA HOWLAND:

Occupation: 1870, Keeping House192

Notes for LEWIS FERRIS:

In the 1870 census, Danby, Tompkins  County, NY, Lewis is listed as 32 and Theresa as 28.  Their farm was valued at $3,000 and they had $1,000 in personal property.   Charles was listed as 4 years old and Clara as age 1.

More About LEWIS FERRIS:

Occupation: 1870, Farmer

Children of THERESA HOWLAND and LEWIS FERRIS are:

                   i.    CHARLES M.11 FERRIS192,193, b. August 07, 1865193.

                  ii.    CLARA D. FERRIS194,195, b. March 06, 1869195.

                 iii.    FLOYD T. FERRIS195,196, b. September 21, 1879, New York197; m. MARY A.198,199; b. Abt. 1874200.

Notes for FLOYD T. FERRIS:

In 1900, the census mentions that Floyd Ferris, born in September 1879 was living in Ithaca with his step mother, Helen, step brother, and his father.  He was 20 years old at the time of the census.  He was employed as general farmer in 1930 in the Ithaca area.

Floyd T Ferris

Age:           40 years

Estimated birth year:         1879

Birthplace:         New York

Race:          White

Home in 1920:       Forest, Lewis, Washington

Home owned:         View Image

Sex:           View Image

Marital status:          View Image

Year of immigration:          View Image

Able to read & write:         View Image

Roll:          T625_1933

Page:          4B

ED:       143

Image:         0642

In the 1920 census, there are no children with this family.  He is age 40 and she is age 47.

More About FLOYD T. FERRIS:

Occupation: 1930, General Farmer in the Ithaca area.200

Notes for MARY A.:

She was born in New York, but both her parents were born in the Irish Free State per the 1930 census.

14.  GEORGE F.10 HOWLAND (FRANCIS KING9, SENECA8, CHARLES7, COOK6, JAMES5, NATHANIEL4, ZOETH3, HENRY2, HENRY1)201,202 was born October 10, 1844 in South Danby, Tompkins, New York203,204.  He married HARRIET COURTRIGHT205 December 10, 1868205.  She was born June 05, 1850205.

Notes for GEORGE F. HOWLAND:

Found in the 1892 Danby Census.

HOWLAND, George F.,       M                 48     Laborer

                       Harriet,             F                  42 Seamstress

                       Lillian M.           F                  17

                       Earl E.,              M                  13

More About GEORGE F. HOWLAND:

Occupation: 1880, Farmer in Danby, Tompkins County, New York

Children of GEORGE HOWLAND and HARRIET COURTRIGHT are:

                   i.    ANNA MAE11 HOWLAND, b. May 15, 1870, South Danby, Tompkins, New York; d. September 01, 1960, Newfield, New York; m. JUDD DORN, October 31, 1894; b. March 05, 1867; d. February 15, 1930.

                  ii.    LILLIAN MARIA HOWLAND, b. June 04, 1874.

                 iii.    EDGAR EARL HOWLAND, b. March 09, 1879.

                 iv.    FRANCIS HOWLAND, b. January 09, 1894.

15.  AGNES C.10 HOWLAND (FRANCIS KING9, SENECA8, CHARLES7, COOK6, JAMES5, NATHANIEL4, ZOETH3, HENRY2, HENRY1)205,206,207,208,209 was born March 23, 1849210,211.  She married THEODORE CLOSE212,213,214 February 27, 1871215, son of TOMPKINS CLOSE and SALLY.  He was born September 15, 1841 in Stanwich, Fairfield, Conn.216.

Notes for THEODORE CLOSE:

They had a farm in or near Stanwich, Conn.

More About THEODORE CLOSE:

Occupation: 1900, Farmer217

Children of AGNES HOWLAND and THEODORE CLOSE are:

                   i.    RALPH TOMPKINS11 CLOSE218, b. January 08, 1872, Connecticut219.

                  ii.    EVERETT R . CLOSE220,221, b. September 1879, Connecticut222,223; m. (1) JENNIE B.; m. (2) JANE S.; b. 1879, New York.

                 iii.    JOHN LEWIS CLOSE, b. 1882.

16.  HARRIET ADELAIDE10 HOWLAND (JAMES K.9, SENECA8, CHARLES7, COOK6, JAMES5, NATHANIEL4, ZOETH3, HENRY2, HENRY1)224 was born May 24, 1842225.  She married GEORGE W. PECK October 16, 1867. 

Notes for HARRIET ADELAIDE HOWLAND:

George W. Peck was a merchant in Ithaca, New York.  He enlisted as a private in Co. M. 9th N.Y. Heavy Artillery, August, 1864.  This regiment was attached to the 2nd brigade, 3 division, 6th arm corps, and during the summer and fall of 1864 was stationed in the Shenandoah Valley, VA. under Gen. Sheridan.  In December, it was sent to join the forces in front of Petersburg, and remained there until the close of the war, in the spring of 1865.  He was mustered out at Syracuse, N.Y., in August, 1865.

In the 1860 census, at the age of 18, her occupation is listed as Teacher at the Common School.

Notes for GEORGE W. PECK:

George W. Peck enlisted as a private in Co. M., 9th N.Y. Heavy Artillery, August, 1864.  This regiment was attached to the 2nd brigade, 3rd division, 6th army corps, and during the Summer and Fall of 1864 was stationed in the Shenandoah Valley, VA. under Gen. Sheridan.  In December it was sent to join the forces in front of Petersburg, and remained there until the close of the war, in the Spring of 1865.  He was mustered out at Syracuse, N.Y., in August 1865.

Children of HARRIET HOWLAND and GEORGE PECK are:

                   i.    JAMES MILTON11 PECK, b. June 04, 1870; m. MARY S..

Notes for JAMES MILTON PECK:

In the 1930 census, he is found on line 34 in Newfield, Tompkins County, New York.  He is listed as an Engineer.

More About JAMES MILTON PECK:

Occupation: 1930, Engineer

                  ii.    BERTIE LYMAN PECK, b. December 22, 1875.

                 iii.    CARRIE MAUD PECK, b. March 18, 1879.

                 iv.    NINA LETO PECK, b. August 05, 1882.

17.  WILLIAM A.10 HOWLAND (JAMES K.9, SENECA8, CHARLES7, COOK6, JAMES5, NATHANIEL4, ZOETH3, HENRY2, HENRY1)226 was born August 23, 1844227, and died in Danby, Tompkins Co., New York.  He married MARY E. BAKER September 16, 1874. 

Notes for WILLIAM A. HOWLAND:

Known in the family as "Little Will."  He married Mary Baker was was "an awful scold and a real shrew" according to notes on the family by Arthur C. Howland.

He enlisted as a private in Co. I, 179th N.Y. Vols. on Aug 23, 1864, and was attached to the 2nd brigade, 2nd division, 9th arm corps, and sent to Petersburg, VA Sep 20 1864.  He was engaged in the first battle at Pegram Farm  on Sep 30 1864, and also in the battle of 1 Apr 1865, at the same place.  He was at the capture of Richmond and Petersburg, and was mustered out on Jun 8 1865.  He lived in Danby, N.Y. and was a member of the M.E. church.

William A. HOWLAND, private, Co. E, 179th N.Y. Regiment; enlisted August 23, 1864; discharged June 8, 1865.

Child of WILLIAM HOWLAND and MARY BAKER is:

                   i.    MARGARET11 HOWLAND, b. 1878; d. December 1880.

18.  EMMA10 HOWLAND (JAMES K.9, SENECA8, CHARLES7, COOK6, JAMES5, NATHANIEL4, ZOETH3, HENRY2, HENRY1)228,229 was born January 11, 1848230.  She married ESQ. MERRITT KING December 25, 1866, son of SAMUEL KING and AMY WYATT.  He was born Abt. 1839 in Ithaca, Tompkins, New York, and died Bef. 1900.

Notes for EMMA HOWLAND:

Emma E. Howland, a teacher before her marriage to Merritt King, a lawyer of Ithaca, Dec. 25, 1866.

Lyman E. King died first before completing a medical course at the University of Michigan.  Mary E. who died when but 20.  Ella T. living with Mrs. King in Ithaca.

Notes for ESQ. MERRITT KING:

Mr. King , a lawyer of Ithaca, New York, enlisted as a private in Co. K, 137th N.Y. Vols. Aug 19, 1862, and was elected 3rd sergeant, Sep 19 1862.  He was elected to captain on Mar 26, 1865, brevet major on May 25, 1865 and was mustered out on Jun 12 1865.  The regiment was attached to the 3rd brigade, 2nd division, 12 army corps, army of the Potomac, until September, 1863, and was engaged at Chancellorsville, Gettysburgh, Wauhatchie, Lookout Mountain, Mission Ridge, Pea Vine Creek, Ringgold, Dug Gap, Resaca, New Hope Church, Lost Mountain, Pine Knob, siege of Atlanta, Sherman's March to the Sea, Siege of Savannah, South Edisto River, etc.

King, Merritt 23, enrolled 8/20/1862 Danby, 3 yr, sgt co K 137th inf, prom 1st sgt, in as 2nd Lt Captain 1/11/1865, out 6/9/1865 near Bladensburg; Major Ny by brevet - mor

King, Merritt, born 10/29/1838, Danby en sgt co K  137th en Danby  3 yr, sin son Samuel B and Amy Wayatt, farmer dis 6/20/1865  Elmira - ob

King, Merritt 23 enrolled 8/20/1862 Danby sgt co k 137 inf prom lst sgt 2nd lt, captain out 6/9/l865 near Bladensburg, Md [6]

born Danby 10/29/1838, son Samuel also born Danby Merritt prom to major in Civil War Was a lawyer after the war. Married to Emma A Howland, dau. James K of Danby 12/25/1866 - OB single, son Samuel B and Amy Wayat, farmer in l865 lived in Danby,dis 6/20/l865 at Elmira

More About ESQ. MERRITT KING:

Burial: Ithaca, Tompkins, New York

Occupation: 1870, Attorney at Law

Children of EMMA HOWLAND and MERRITT KING are:

                   i.    MARY11 KING, b. Ithaca, Tompkins, New York; d. Bef. 1885.

Notes for MARY KING:

Died at age 20 according to a history of the family prepared by Charles Howland of South Danby for the family reunion in 1885.

                  ii.    LYMAN KING, b. Ithaca, Tompkins, New York; d. Bef. 1885.

Notes for LYMAN KING:

Died before completing a medical course at the University of Michigan according to the notes on the family prepared by Charles Howland of South Danby for the family Reunion in 1885.

                 iii.    ELLA T. KING, b. Ithaca, Tompkins, New York.

                 iv.    MAUD KING, b. 1868, Ithaca, Tompkins, New York.

                  v.    WILLIS E. KING, b. August 13, 1871, Ithaca, Tompkins, New York.

Notes for WILLIS E. KING:

In 1900 Willis is lving as a boarder with his mother, Emma in the household of his aunt and uncle, George W. and Harriet A. Peck.  His occupation in the 1900 census is listed as Physician.

More About WILLIS E. KING:

Occupation: 1900, Physician

19.  ELLA T.10 HOWLAND (JAMES K.9, SENECA8, CHARLES7, COOK6, JAMES5, NATHANIEL4, ZOETH3, HENRY2, HENRY1) was born November 08, 1856 in New York231.  She married MERTON D. GIBBS232 Abt. 1884232.  He was born Abt. 1847 in New York233.

More About MERTON D. GIBBS:

Occupation: 1930, Attorney at Law234

Child of ELLA HOWLAND and MERTON GIBBS is:

                   i.    DOROTHY11 GIBBS235, b. July 1894, New York235.

20.  MARIA A.10 WILLSEY (HARRIET AMANDA9 HOWLAND, SENECA8, CHARLES7, COOK6, JAMES5, NATHANIEL4, ZOETH3, HENRY2, HENRY1)236,237,238,239 was born November 14, 1849240.  She married ARCHIBALD W. BENEDICT241,242 February 11, 1874, son of HORACE BENEDICT and NANCY L..  He was born Abt. 1846 in Cortland, New York243.

Child of MARIA WILLSEY and ARCHIBALD BENEDICT is:

                   i.    JAY WILSEY11 BENEDICT244, b. December 20, 1882245; d. 1920; m. ELLA L. REED246; b. 1885; d. 1925.

Notes for JAY WILSEY BENEDICT:

Jay W. Benedict and Ella Lorrinda Reed were married and lived on a farm in Willseyville, N.Y. with their three children Bernice (Bea), Archibald W. (Bud) and Helen Reed.  The farm house must have been passed down from Jay W.'s family.  Archibald W. Benedict and Maria Willsey, his parents, had lived there and before them, Maria's parents, William W. Willsey and Harriet Amanda Howland.  William W. Willsey was the son of The Honorable Jacob Willsey who I think may have established the farm and the town of Willseyville.  I and other family members have many beautiful artifacts from the household that can be traced back to Harriet Amanda Howland,  possibly further. 

   

As my Grandmother explained to me, her father Jay W. Benedict ran the local post office ( I have seen photos of him in a horse drawn delivery wagon).  He became ill with an upper respiratory infection and passed away sometime in the early 1920's.  In order to sustain the family with an income, my Great Grandmother, Ella opened a "Tea Room".  Willseyville served as a rest stop between Ithaca and Owego, N.Y.  Ironic that Jacob Willsey was also known to have ran a stagecoach stop there as well in the 1800's.  Ella ran the Tea Room until she became ill in 1925 and passed away.  Grandma told me her Mother had been caring for several ill family members and then went out of town to care for a relative who had been burned while cooking.  Ella became exhausted and ill herself.  Grandma shared her experience of waking up and seeing her Mother's bedding hung on the clothes line and knowing then that she had passed away.  Helen was 12 years old.  It has always amazed me that she survived that heartbreaking event at such a young age.

The children were split up and sent to live with different family members.  Grandma went to a relative's home in Johnson City N.Y..  It was a very sad time for her and she said she had not been treated well there.  Eventually she at some point in her teens, went back to Willseyville and was cared for by Aunt Hattie and Aunt Addie Howland and an Uncle Henry Benedict---who we are not sure who he was related to .  Jay W. was supposedly an only child.  It's not clear who was living at the farm house, however, a close family friend named Frank Manning may have been living there and or caring for the property. 

    

My Grandmother met and married my Grandfather Fredrick Decker in Cortland, N.Y.  When my mother was in her teens the farm was sold to Frank Manning and remained in his family through the the late 1970's.  I remember visiting him at the farm with my Grandmother when I was a young child.  Grandma frequently took the turn off to Willseyville and would take me on a tour of the town when we traveld between Ithaca and Vestal.

[Melissa Pearce - 03/04/05]

21.  RUFUS BASSETT10 HOWLAND (CHARLES9, SENECA8, CHARLES7, COOK6, JAMES5, NATHANIEL4, ZOETH3, HENRY2, HENRY1)247,248 was born September 15, 1851 in South Danby, Tompkins, New York249, and died July 1923.  He married ELEANOR DALE 1878.  She was born 1855, and died 1892.

Notes for RUFUS BASSETT HOWLAND:

Rufus Bassett Howland was born 14 Sep 1851.  He was an intelligent man of kindly disposition and quiet humor.  He was loved dearly by his younger brother, Arthur C. Howland.  Rufus was 20 years older that Arthur and was almost a father to him.  The only time his daughter ever knew of her own father to cry was when Uncle Rufus died in 1923 of cancer.  Earlier Rufus had come to be with the family in Philadelphia in order to have the best medical advice at the university of Pennsylvania.  The family must have been told there was nothing that could be done and he returned to Trumansburg.

Rufus married Eleanor Dale (born 3 Dec. 1855) on 27 Jun, 1878.  There were three children, Susan, born 15 Jan 1886; Charles born 10 May 1888; and Eleanor, born 23 Nov. 1889.  Charles lived only two months, and Eleanor lived five years.  Rufus' wife died 2 Aug. 1892, probably of diphtheria, and he never remarried.  His sister Elizabeth came to live with him and Susan.

Rufus taught mathematics and was dean of boys at Wyoming Seminary in Kingston, Pa. until his retirement in 1917.  Summers were spent at the family homestead in south Danby.  In 1917 Rufus bought the house in Trumansburg and moved there.  Here his brother, Arthur, and family would often join him for summer vacations.  On the five acres, in addition to the large white clapboard house, there was a big red barn, a chicken house, and of course a well near the back door.  The eight members of the family would sit around the dining room table, Uncle Rufus, a deeply religious man, always said a blessing before dinner.  There would be much conversation and a lot of joking.  Uncle Rufus had grown very deaf. Susan, his daughter, always sat on his right and in a quiet voice would repeat whatever he had missed in the conversation.  He was always able to hear her.  Uncle Rufus was kind and gentle with us children and he and my father and brothers would go off on what appeared to be to be very adventurous expeditions.  Dad sometimes called him "reckless Ruffie."

In 1868 Rufus entered Cornell, graduating in Civil Engineering in 1872, the first full four-year class to graduate.  His class gave the University an avenue of elm trees which I can remember and hope have not succumbed to the elm blight.  Upon graduation, he taught for a year in School District #1 and in the fall of 1873 started teaching at Wyoming Seminary.

More About RUFUS BASSETT HOWLAND:

Cause of Death (Facts Pg): Cancer

Degree: 1872, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York

Education: Bet. 1868 - 1872, Civil Engineering

Children of RUFUS HOWLAND and ELEANOR DALE are:

                   i.    SUSAN DALE11 HOWLAND, b. January 15, 1886, Daleville, Lackawana Co., Pennsylvania; d. January 1961, Trumansburg, Tompkins, New York.

Notes for SUSAN DALE HOWLAND:

Cousin Sue was a quiet gracious lady.  She had the rare quality of listening sympathetically yet never interfered to tell you what you should have done or try to run your life.  As a young woman she was very shy which may be why she never married -- a pity, as she would have made a wonderful mother.  She attended Wyoming Seminary, where she lived with her father, Rufus.

Susan attended Wyoming Seminary Preparatory School in Kinston, Pennsylvania where her father was an instructor.  After she graduated she applied to Wellesley Univeristy.

She graduated from Wellesley and then attended Cornell where she must have studied poultry raising in the School of Agriculture.  In Trumansburg she raised white leghorns in the latest scientific method.  I can remember the eggs being hatched in incubators, the very clean chicken houses, how Cousin Sue would cull the sick chickens from the well, so that the disease wouldn't spread, and often be able to nurse them back to health.  In the big hen house, the hens were very tame and would let your gather the eggs from under them and not peck your hands.  If a hen insisted on sitting on her eggs to hatch them, the hen would be placed in a cage which hung above the floor from the ceiling.  sometimes there would be several hens in this cage.  They were usually cured quickly of remaining on the nest.  Cousin Sue's market was New York City where the young roosters were sent to become broilers and the eggs for sale at the better stores.

Since all the family liked books, there was much mutual enjoyment in books with Cousin Sue reading aloud.  Sue never received any blue ribbons or medals, but she quietly helped others all her life.  she was devoted to her father, Rufus, and nursed him during his final illness.  She cared for her Aunt Elizabeth after she became helpless and eventually for her Aunt Mary.

After Clarence Edward (Ted) Darling's serious heart attack, when he could no longer work, she took us all in and we lived with her nine months.  It couldn't have been easy for her and Aunt Mary to have a family of four arrive--one sick man, and two children.

Trumansburg had no library and Susan started one and kept it going.  One of her friends once told me she had a real cultural influence on the town.  Aunt Ina Geung, a second cousin of Arthur C. Howland, and a frequent visitor at Trumansburg called Cousin Sue, "the Rock of Gibraltar," for her steadfastness and reliability.  In 1959 Cousin Sue came to visit Emily H. Darling in Swarthmore and I thought I would see that she had a good time and we would do many nice things  together.  Two days after her arrival she was in the hospital, diagnosed with cancer and had a kidney removed.  Within two years she was dead.

After Susan's death she was cremated.  Her ashs were taken to Emily's house in Swarthmore as scattered there.  This was told to her son many years later to her son.

More About SUSAN DALE HOWLAND:

Burial: Creamated and her ashes are scattered in the backyard of 321 Haverford Place, Swarthmore, PA

Cause of Death (Facts Pg): Cancer of the Kidney

Degree: Wellesley College

Education: Cornell University, Ithaca, New York

                  ii.    CHARLES HOWLAND, b. 1888; d. 1888.

                 iii.    ELEANOR HOWLAND, b. 1889; d. 1894.

22.  ARTHUR CHARLES10 HOWLAND (CHARLES9, SENECA8, CHARLES7, COOK6, JAMES5, NATHANIEL4, ZOETH3, HENRY2, HENRY1)250,251,252,253 was born December 24, 1869 in South Danby, Tompkins, New York254, and died March 29, 1952 in Swarthmore, Delaware, Pennsylvania.  He married EMILY WYCKOFF BERRY255,256,257 September 03, 1902 in Upper Montclair, New Jersey, daughter of LLOYD BERRY and GABRIALLE MOTT.  She was born May 04, 1871 in Southport, Conn., and died September 01, 1966 in Chester, Delaware, Pennsylvania.

Notes for ARTHUR CHARLES HOWLAND:

Arthur Charles Howland was the son of Charles Howland and Maria Alida Bassett.  He was born in a white clapboard farm house in South Danby, New York on Dec 24, 1869, assisted by a neighbor as there was never a doctor on those occasions.  He was one of six children, two of whom died at birth.  His brother Rufus was almost 20 years older and there were two sisters, Elizabeth and Mary.  They were a close, loving family and remained so all their lives, helping each other as best they could in times of need.

Life must have been hard on the farm.  The land was poor and there was little cash.  Dad used to say that because of its remoteness, they lived like and used the equipment of an earlier generation.

Arthur delighted in telling stories about his childhood and the characters who lived on neighboring farms.   Some of these stories are recorded in his Family Recollections which he wrote when he was 80 years old.  One not there was of the terrible tempered Francis Van de Bogart. He had lost his temper and was doing something outrageous and foolish when his wife grabbed the butcher knife and chased him under the bed. She demanded he come out and he answered, "I have too much grit to come out." Dad used to tell about an uncle by marriage, Clark Lounsbury, who used to visit them.  Lounsbury had nine children, seven of whom died in infancy. He never really supported his family.  He was a fanatic abolitionist and later temperance agitator.  Dad would recall how excited Uncle Clark would get on the subject of temperance.  He would froth at the mouth and pound on the table about the evils of drink.

The ministers who served the little Methodist Church in South Danby were often ardent but ignorant men.  Even as a young boy, Dad could be amused at the preacher, talking of the sins of the wicked as described in the Bible, declaring in a loud voice, "And Egypt that great city, whar is she?"  Since Arthur was already reading everything he could get his hands on, no wonder his religious skepticism began to grow.  He notes in his recollections the beginning of skepticism at age six.  Apparently he had a pair of new trousers -- probably the first new ones he had ever had. He wore them for the first time going to church. When he knelt for the prayers, he prayed that the knees would not get dirty.  But when he got up he found that his prayer had not been answered.

Arthur and his sister, Mary, attended a little one room school.  When he was 13, there was a very inadequate teacher.  She had been told by the man who hired her not to hesitate to whip the children.  She did a lot of that, but was not well enough educated to teach them anything.  After a few weeks Arthur and Mary grew disgusted.  One day Arthur put a small stone under the window so it would not lock.  After supper he returned to the school house, got in through the window, removed his and Mary's books and took them home telling his parents they would not go back to school unless they insisted.  They must have understood the situation for Mary did not go back until the following term when there was another teacher. Arthur  went to the nearest high school which was in Ithaca (where he lived with Emma Howland King on Buffalo St. in Ithaca) and from there to Wyoming Seminary where his brother Rufus was dean of boys.

Arthur  was not cut out to be a farmer.  When he he helped with the work on the farm, he carried a Latin text book in his pocket and studied paradigms when the horses were resting.  This was at age 12.  He walked three miles twice a week to the home of a neighbor to recite Latin lessons.  When he was nine, his father was having a discussion with a friend on politics and some point in American history came up about with both men were uncertain.  He astonished them by innocently remarking they were both wrong and given them the correct facts.  He was already very fond of reading history.

Arthur would sometimes walk over to Mr. Simms' farm to visit with him. Mr. Simms had escaped slavery and come north from Virginia in 1859.  At age 15, Arthur took notes on Simms' story and the write up was posted on the internet for Tompkins county Rootsweb project.

When Arthur attended Wyoming Seminary,  his job was to ring the bell which awoke the students in the morning, called them to classes, etc. The other boys would sometimes turn the bill upside down and fill it with water.  Arthur soon learned to be cautious.  After graduation from the Seminary, he taught school a year and then entered Cornell, graduating in the class of 1893.  It was at Cornell that he met Emily Wycoff Berry whom he married 3 September 1902.  Much of their courtship was by letter as he graduated two years before she did.  During the academic year 1894-95, he had a fellowship to study at Gottingen and Leipzig; while later Emily W. Berry taught in Corning while Arthur was in New York City.  Arthur lived with a German family and liked the Germans very much, finding them friendly and good company.  The hate against the Germans in this country by World War I upset him, and Hitler and World War II must have shaken him still more.

While working on the research for his Ph.D. thesis, he was hired to index Andrew D. White's Warfare of Science with Dogmatic Theology.  White had been president of Cornell.  He was growing feeble and his site took over the management of his affairs.  Mrs. White paid Arthur  $.15 or $.20 per hour, but began to make difficulty about payments arguing that they were too much, and that she was over paying him.  Arthur's comment in his recollections was that she got a mighty good bargain.  The index was an excellent piece of work and it was the kind of work that took considerable expert knowledge and required much exactness and accuracy. He considered Mrs. White a cantankerous old woman.  One or two of her sisters had the same reputation in Swarthmore, were the family lived, her father having been president of Swarthmore College.  After that time Arthur always thought of Quakers as a tight fisted bunch.

Professors were poorly paid. In 1911, Arthur was made a full professor, he was earning only $2,400 a year, not much even in those days with which to support a family of five.  He added a little to his income teaching in summer school every year, and also with what his wife called "pot boilers" - reading college entrance exams and giving courses at the Villa Maria Convent in West Chester.  The nuns thought very highly of him.  One said, "Professor Howland knows so much.  It is too bad de doesn't know just a little more and become Catholic."

After receiving his Ph. D. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1897, Arthur Howland served as an instructor of European History at the University of Illinois for a year and then taught at Teachers College, Columbia University for five years.  In 1904 he was appointed Assistant Professor of Medieval History at the University of Pennsylvania and became a full professor in 1911.

 In 1934 he was appointed to the Henry Charles Lea professorship which post he held until his retirement in 1940.  It was that year that the University awarded him the honorary degree of Litt. D.  His daughter Emily well remembers the occasion.  President Roosevelt the President of the United States appeared upon the stage and everyone in the huge hall rose in his honor.  In those days the President did not appear nightly on a television screen and it was a rare privilege to see him.

When Arthur's successor was called to active military duty in World War II, he resumed teaching as Lecturer in Medieval History 1942-43.  He was also curator of the Henry Charles Lea Library.  Henry Charles Lea was a distinguished historian whose specialty was witchcraft which was also on of Arthur's fields, as he had worked with Lea.  Mr. Lea's Library with its collection of 15,000 books had been moved in its entirety from his home to the University of Pennsylvania.  It is a beautiful room of black walnut panelling with a gallery running around it.

Arthur had a wonder sense of humor, was witty and loved to tell a good story.  He was respected by his colleagues and the library staff and admired and loved by his students.  He was often approached by a former student and greeted warmly.

Arthur held an honorary position as Advisor to the Library Committee of the University Club of Philadelphia of which he was a member for many years.  In 1952 the Committee passed the following Resolution:

"Unaffected simplicity of demeanor, with a sense of quizzical humor ever ready to mellow the established authority of his scholarship, gave a special tang to the personality of Arthur C. Howland, whose recent death deprives the Library Committee of a much valued member.  In hereby registering an estimate of its loss, the Committee especially notes that Dr. Howland wore his academic honors 'with a difference.'  He taught history at Penn and had had charge there of the remarkable Henry C. Lea Library.  But significant as these achievements were, they do not imply a finished portrait.  They do not indicate the measure of his charm.  A historian can be stuffy.  Dr. Howland certainly can be absolved on that score.

You could scarcely have gauged the scope of his accomplishments by his delightful informal commentary on people and books and cabbages and kings.  As a friend (who happens also to be a savant) he will be much missed."

Emily Hinton Howland said of her parents, they were fine parents to their three children, Charles Berry, Arthur Lloyd and Emily Hinton.  Because of being a teacher, Dad was able to spend more time with his children than many fathers.  He answered all questions frankly and honestly and without seeming to lecture and taught us honesty, consideration for others - that is, good morals.  one of the highlights of the day was when he read to us in the evenings.  My brothers loved Treasure Island and similar stories. I remember one summer Dad prepared a treasure hunt for the boys with various clues to follow which finally led to the digging up of the treasure.  I don't remember what the treasure was.  The pursuit of the clues was the fun.  Dad taught us to recognize the various kinds of birds and their songs.  He didn't like to get up early, but I remember one morning in Trumansburg he got up at 5 A.M. to take Budge (Arthur Lloyd) and me (Emily) to Taughannock park to hear and spot the birds.  How the country has changed since those days.  At Taughannock there were no paved roads and no park attendant to collect a parking fee.  A dirt road with grass growing down the middle ran close to the edge of the gorge.  No signs told you to keep away from the edge.  It was assumed you had a little common sense or had a parent with you who did.  There were fossils to be picked up in the gorge or along the shores of Cayuga lake.

As a young man Dad played the banjo and mandolin.   He loved music.  The family used to sing a lot and one of the happy memories of Emily's childhood is of sitting by the fireplace on Christmas Eve singing Christmas carols.

More About ARTHUR CHARLES HOWLAND:

Burial: West Laurel Hills Cemetery, Rockland Section, Lot 133, Southen Half, Bala Cynwyd, Philadelphia, PA

Degree: 1897, Ph.D. History, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

Education: Wyoming Seminary, Kingston, PA

Notes for EMILY WYCKOFF BERRY:

Emily Wyckoff Berry was the oldest of five children.  A great deal of responsibility fell on her shoulders.  She won a scholarship to Cornell University, being the only one in her family to go to college.  (Very few women attended college in those days.)  It was a wonderful experience for her and she talked about her friends in the class of 1895 and kept in touch with them all her life.  She joined Delta Gamma sorority.    It was at Cornell the she met her future husband, Arthur C. Howland.

After he graduated in 1893, they corresponded regularly, and he kept many of her letters written from 1893 through 1900.  It is unfortunate that we do not have his to her.  From the letters, we can follow what she was doing and guess what he had written to her.  By 1894 they were no longer addressing each other as Mr. Howland and Miss Berry.

By 1897, Emily had a teaching job in Corning, New York where she taught Algebra, Geometry, Greek and Roman History and French.  She loved the teaching but thoroughly disliked the rough railroad town.  It must have been a lonesome time for both of them.

I remember the story being told of her early teaching experience.  One day her heard a terrible fight going one outside her classroom.  She went out with every intention of intervening if she could, but discovered that it was the school principal administering a little discipline to one of the older students in the stairwell.  She returned to her class and closed the door.

More About EMILY WYCKOFF BERRY:

Burial: September 03, 1966, West Laurel Hills Cemetery, Rockland Section, Lot 133, Southen Half, Bala Cynwyd, Philadelphia, PA

Degree: 1895, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York

Children of ARTHUR HOWLAND and EMILY BERRY are:

                   i.    ESQ. CHARLES BERRY11 HOWLAND258,259,260, b. July 14, 1905, Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA261,262; d. February 16, 1969, Swarthmore, Delaware, Pennsylvania; m. MADELENE TAWS ELLIS263, November 17, 1939; b. May 04, 1914263; d. 1995, Newtown Square, Delaware, Pennsylvania.

Notes for ESQ. CHARLES BERRY HOWLAND:

Charles Berry Howland was born at home in Philadelphia, PA.  he was the oldest of three children, and the role of leader was always his for his generation for his entire life.

After his younger brother, Arthur (Budge) was born, there were always the inevitable squabbles between the boys.  Their mother would separate them and administer the disciple she thought appropriate, but the struggle to establish dominance continued until one day when their father prevented their mother's intervention.

Charlie graduated from Law School in 1929, the year of the great stock market crash.  Charlie secured one of the few legal jobs available at the time, and was employed by a law firm that represented banking interests in foreclosures and bankruptcies.

Because his father was a teacher, he was able to spend more time with his children than many fathers.  AH Howland used to read to the children in the evenings.  Charlie and Budge both loved Treasure Island and similar stories.  On summer ACH prepared a treasure hunt for the boys with various clues to follow which finally led to the digging up of the treasure.  Emily doesn't remember what the treasure was.  The pursuit of the clues was the fun.

More About ESQ. CHARLES BERRY HOWLAND:

Burial: February 18, 1969, West Laurel Hills Cemetary, Rockland Section, Lot 133, Southen Half, Bala Cynwyd, Philadelphia, PA

Degree: 1929, J.D. University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

Military service: US Navy during WW II, naval intelligence

Occupation: Attorney at Law in Philadelphia

Notes for MADELENE TAWS ELLIS:

Madelene was a very winsome woman, with dark eyes and dark hair.  She had a gift for artistic talent and was a fashion artist in her early professional career.  When the war came, (WW II) she got a job designing parachutes.   For a time she also painted family coats-of-arms.

Madelene was also the family genealogist.   Much of my family history is the result of her hard work and research. As her talents developed, she began to make a living researching family histories for those who would pay her hourly rate.  She specialized in the Philadelphia and Pennsylvania area.

Madelene also had a pension for gardening.  Her house in Swarthmore was always beautiful, and when not doing genealogy she could be found with a trowel and flowerpot in hand.

More About MADELENE TAWS ELLIS:

Burial: West Laurel Hills Cemetary, Rockland Section, Lot 133, Southen Half, Bala Cynwyd, Philadelphia, PA

                  ii.    ARTHUR LLOYD HOWLAND264,265,266, b. January 13, 1908, Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania267,268; d. November 23, 1978, Evanston, Ill; m. JEAN MARIAN SMITH, December 15, 1938; b. August 19; d. Evanston, Ill.

Notes for ARTHUR LLOYD HOWLAND:

Arthur Lloyd Howland (January 13, 1908 -- November 23, 1978) received his A.B. degree from Cornell in 1929, M.A. from Northwestern in 1931, and Ph.D. from Princeton in 1933. Art began his faculty career at Northwestern as an Instructor in 1933 and retired as Professor of Geological Sciences in 1976. His geological work included many years of studies of the structure, petrology and mineralogy of Precambrian rocks, and mineral deposits of chromite, copper-nickel sulfides, and platinum-group metals. He worked extensively in the field on the iron formations in Minnesota, the Stillwater Complex in Montana, in Newfoundland, Society Islands, and Brazil. During World War II he was associated with the U.S. Geological Survey in the Strategic Minerals Program and the Military Geology Unit, later working part-time in the Mineral Deposits Branch.

For twenty-four years, since 1945 to 1969, Arthur Howland served as the Chairman of Department of Geology, later renamed Department of Geological Sciences. Art's outstanding contribution as Chairman to the growth of the Department in the late 1940s was his bringing to Northwestern faculty such individuals as W.C. Krumbein, L.L. Sloss and R.M. Garrels, each of whom became a distinguished and inspiring pioneer of world renown in his field. During Art Howland's tenure as the Chairman, the Department moved from University Hall to Locy Hall, the building it occupies at present.

The Howland Fund was established on January 22, 1979, from a gift of Mrs. Barbara Z. Wilson, under the name of Arthur L. Howland Geological Sciences Field Study Fund. Over the years, gifts from the alumni contributed to a substantial growth of the Fund principal, the income from which is used to support field-related research work.

More About ARTHUR LLOYD HOWLAND:

Degree: Ph.D. Geology, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois

Occupation: Professor of Geology, Northwestern University, Evenston, Ill.

                 iii.    EMILY HINTON HOWLAND269,270,271, b. November 07, 1911, Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania272,273; d. December 05, 2002, Newtown Square, Delaware County, Pennsylvania274; m. (1) CLARENCE EDWARD DARLING274, December 27, 1939, Swarthmore, Delaware, Pennsylvania275,276; b. October 17, 1901, Salisbury, Fulton Co., New York277; d. July 07, 1957, Cleveland Heights, Ohio; m. (2) KENNETH LEEDS PIKE278, January 17, 1981, Scarsdale, Westchester Co., New York; b. June 03, 1906, Chelsea, Mass.; d. August 01, 1990, Lower Merion, Montgomery Co., Pennsylvania.

Notes for EMILY HINTON HOWLAND:

Obit. Philadelphia Inquirer 12/10/2002

Emily Howland Pike, Librarian, 91

Emily Howland Pike, 91, a retired librarian, died of complications from a stroke Thursday at Dunwoody village, a retirement community in Newtown Square, PA.

Mrs. Pike grew up in Swarthmore and graduated from Swarthmore High School.  After Earning a bachelor's degree from Swarthmore College in 1933 (in History), she served as a social worker for several years in Philadelphia until her marriage in 1939 to Clarence Edward Darling.

They were living in Cleveland when her husband died in 1957.  Their son Roger Darling said his mother moved back to Swarthmore and went to work as a business librarian for Scott Paper Co. to support her two young sons.  She earned a master's degree in library science from Drexel University  at night.

After retiring from Scott in 1976, she was a librarian for five years for the Federal Reserve Bank in Philadelphia.

She was married for nine years to Kenneth L. Pike, until his death in 1990.

Mrs. Pike was a volunteer at the library at Dunwoody Village, where she had lived for the last 15 years.  She enjoyed bridge, bird-watching, swimming, gardening and reading history and current events.

In addition to her son Roger, she is survived by son Arthur Howland Darling; and four grandchildren.

A memorial service will be held at a later date (Feb 15, 2003).  Burial is private.

More About EMILY HINTON HOWLAND:

Burial: February 15, 2003, West Laurel Hills Cemetery, Rockland Section, Lot 133, Southen Half, Bala Cynwyd, Philadelphia, PA

Cause of Death (Facts Pg): December 05, 2002, Complications from stroke

Degree: 1967, M.S. in Library Science from Drexel Institute of Technology in Philadelphia

Education: 1929, Swarthmore High School in Swarthmore, PA

Elected: June 25, 1967, Beta Phi Mu - International Library Science Honor Society

Occupation: Business Librarian for Scott Paper Company

Notes for CLARENCE EDWARD DARLING:

I remember my father as being a very compassionate man, the type of person who would stop and help a strangers who found themselves in one jam or another.  He also had a soft heart for animals.  When I was in second or third grade, we were having mouse problems in our rented place near Lake Erie in Euclid.  My father devised a mouse trap from a cigar box, cutting a hole in the side and placing some oatmeal in the box. The box was placed on the kitchen counter where there had been mouse evidence the night before and waited.  It was not far into the evening after I had gone to bed that my father heard small sounds in the kitchen coming from the box.  He crept in and turned the box so that the hole was to the wall, trapping the mouse in the box until morning when he would show me. The next morning, we went to the box and with great ceremony opened the top.  The mouse had vanished and so had the oatmeal, but the mouse had left several small dark calling cards.  It quickly became evident that my father had rotated the box too far, and instead of pointing the exit hole to the wall, he had turned it so the mouse could leave in the other direction on the counter.

He loved hiking, and when he was not working he would take the family for hikes and picnics in parks, or fishing.   This love of the outdoors was passed along to both his sons.

Clarence Edward Darling was a chemical engineer and graduated at Rensselaer Polytechnic al Institute in Troy, New York in 1926.  Shortly after graduating he became interested in applying industrial engineering principles to sales problems and served a number of corporations: (1926-27) Public Service Electric & Gas Co, Newark, NJ.  The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (1927-29); American Standards Association (1929-30); J. Walter Thompson Co., (1930-31); Dobson Engineering Co. (1932);  E.I. Dupont de Nemours, Grascelli Chemicals Dept. (1934-43); McKinsey & Co. (1943-44); Daniel Starch & Staff, General Manager (1945); Barrett Division, Allied Chemical & Dye Corp. (1945-54);

He taught evening courses in Industrial marketing at College of the City of New York.  He was a member, American management Association, American Marketing Association, Chemical Market Research Association; RPI Alumni Advisory Council; President Westchester Alumni Association; F & AM and Royal Arch Mason.  Member of the Town Club of Scarsdale, served on several committees.  Director of Arthur Manor Association and a  member of Community Baptist Church.

They lived in Wilmington, Delaware when their first child was born.  The moved to Scarsdale, Westchester county, New York. About 1952 my father sustained a serious heart attack and the family moved to lived with Emily's relatives on a farm in Trumansburg, Tompkins county, NY.  After a year they moved to Euclid, Ohio, and later to Cleveland Heights, Ohio.

More About CLARENCE EDWARD DARLING:

Burial: 1957, Acacia Park Cemetery, Lot 711, Mayfield Heights, Ohio

Cause of Death: Heart attack secondary to diabetes

Cause of Death (Facts Pg): Heart attack as a complication of diabetes.

Degree: 1927, Rensselaer Polytechnic al Institute in Troy, New York

More About KENNETH LEEDS PIKE:

Cause of Death (Facts Pg): Acute Blastic Leukemia

Occupation: Executive with International Paper

Social Security Number: 028-10-5360

Marriage Notes for EMILY HOWLAND and KENNETH PIKE:

They were married by Herbert W. Hansen in Scarsdale, New York.  It was a second marriage for both.  There were no children from this marriage, they both being beyond the age of retirement.

23.  FRANCIS ARD10 HOWLAND (SENECA9, SENECA8, CHARLES7, COOK6, JAMES5, NATHANIEL4, ZOETH3, HENRY2, HENRY1)279,280,281 was born April 18, 1859 in Greenwich, Conn..  He married JOSEPHINE CLARISSA SMITH282 March 21, 1879283.  She was born December 1858 in Islip, New York284,285.

Notes for FRANCIS ARD HOWLAND:

There appears to be a Record of Francis Ard Howland in the Troy newspaper dated Troy Record, 21 April 1944, but I have be unable to locate the specifics.

More About FRANCIS ARD HOWLAND:

Occupation: 1900, Frank was employed as an "engineer" and had been gainfully employed over the preceeding 12 months.

Children of FRANCIS HOWLAND and JOSEPHINE SMITH are:

                   i.    CLARA REYNOLDS11 HOWLAND285, b. November 05, 1879, New York285.

More About CLARA REYNOLDS HOWLAND:

Occupation: 1900, Clara had been employed 6 of the preceeding 12 months as a dress maker.

Residence: 1900, Their residence was rented at this time.

                  ii.    HARRY KING HOWLAND286, b. December 12, 1880, Connecticut287,288,289; m. ELIZABETH290,291; b. Abt. 1878, New York292; d. , New York293.

Notes for HARRY KING HOWLAND:

In following the census records down through 1930, it appears that this couple did not have children.  In 1930 they lived on 31 Paumanke Avnue, District 7, Babylon, Suffolk, New York.

More About HARRY KING HOWLAND:

Occupation: 1930, Chief Clerk for the railroad294

More About ELIZABETH:

Occupation: January 1920, Not employed295

24.  LABAN CLARK10 HOWLAND (SENECA9, SENECA8, CHARLES7, COOK6, JAMES5, NATHANIEL4, ZOETH3, HENRY2, HENRY1)296,297 was born January 05, 1864.  He married SARAH RICHARDSON298 1888 in Manhattan, New York, New York.  She was born 1868.

Notes for SARAH RICHARDSON:

In the New York City marriages, 1600's  - 1800's Laban C. Howland is stand to have married Sarah Richardson and not Robertson as stated in this genealogy.  The Family History libary of files 1543971-1562446 (Manhattan) and film 1653853 (Brooklyn), for actual certificate.  It is certificate #: 9765  I still need to double check this as fact.

Confirmation came when I found a family photo of Mrs. Richardson.

Children of LABAN HOWLAND and SARAH RICHARDSON are:

                   i.    ETHEL11 HOWLAND299, b. December 1889299,300; m. CAIRNS301.

More About ETHEL HOWLAND:

Occupation: 1920, Dress Maker in a store302

                  ii.    WALTER HOWLAND303,304, b. July 1891, New York305,306,307,307.

More About WALTER HOWLAND:

Occupation: 1920, Engineer in Construction307

                 iii.    LABAN HOWLAND308, b. January 1896, New York308,309,310; m. MARY311; b. Abt. 1908311.

More About LABAN HOWLAND:

Occupation: 1920, Buyer for an Oil Corporation312

Endnotes

1.  Bible Record of Seneca Howland.

2.  Will of Cook Howland.

3.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 138.

4.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 201.

5.  Alexander King, King Bible Records.

6.  1830 Fedeeral Census, New York, Tompkins, Danby, Roll 109, Page 432.

7.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 201.

8.  Bible Record of Seneca Howland.

9.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 201.

10.  Alexander King, King Bible Records.

11.  Clove Dutch Reform Church of Clove Valley, Wantage, Sussex Co., NJ, NYG & B Oybucatuin /v0l. VIII 1928.

12.  Bible Record of Seneca Howland.

13.  Alexander King, King Bible Records.

14.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 201.

15.  Alexander King, King Bible Records.

16.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 201.

17.  South Danby Cemetery, South Danby, Tompkins Co., New York.

18.  Bible Record of Seneca Howland.

19.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 201.

20.  Bible Record of Seneca Howland.

21.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 201.

22.  Bible Record of Seneca Howland.

23.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 201 & 260, Born at South Danby, NY, m. 20, 9, 1827, Clarissa, dau. of Joseph Casterline, of Newfield, Tompkins Co., NY.  He was reared to farming pursuits, and afterwards took up milling.  He was a large, powerful man; a Methodist.  [Handwritten margin note - died 5 Mar, 1878].

24.  1850 Federal Census, New York, Tompkins, Danby, Roll: M432-605, Page 54, Age 43, white, Farmer, value of the farm $1,600.00, born New York.

25.  Bible Record of Seneca Howland.

26.  National Genealogical Society Quarterly, Vol. 60, page 298, Called "Clara."

27.  Year: 1880; Census Place: Danby, Tompkins, New York; Roll: T9_938; Family History Film: 1254938; Page: 46D; Enumeration District: 225; Image: 0095..

28.  1850 Federal Census, New York, Tompkins, Danby, Roll: M432-605, Page 54, Age 42, born New Jersey.

29.  South Danby Cemetery, South Danby, Tompkins Co., New York.

30.  National Genealogical Society Quarterly, Vol. 60, page 299.

31.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 260.

32.  National Genealogical Society Quarterly, Vol. 60, page 299.

33.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 260.

34.  National Genealogical Society Quarterly, Vol. 60, page 299.

35.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 260, Said that they lived in Wisconsin.

36.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 260.

37.  Bible Record of Seneca Howland.

38.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 201.

39.  Bible Record of Seneca Howland.

40.  Adams Settlement Cemetery,.

41.  Adams Settlement Cemetery, Town of Danby, Tompkins Co., New York.

42.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), p 260.

43.  Manderville Cemetery, (Nelson Road) Danby, Tompkins County, New York, grave stone.

44.  Adams Settlement Cemetery, Town of Danby, Tompkins Co., New York.

45.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), p 261.

46.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), p261.

47.  Adams Settlement Cemetery, Town of Danby, Tompkins Co., New York.

48.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), p 261.

49.  Adams Settlement Cemetery, Town of Danby, Tompkins Co., New York.

50.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), p 261.

51.  Adams Settlement Cemetery, Town of Danby, Tompkins Co., New York.

52.  Bible Record of Seneca Howland.

53.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 201.

54.  1860, Census, US, New York, Tioga, Candor, (July 20, 1860), Line 28; Harriet Willsey, age 46.

55.  1870 Federal Census, New York, Tioga, Candor, (June 14, 1870), Page 28, Line 20; Harriet A. age 56, Keeping house, born New York State.

56.  1880 Federal Census, New York, Tioga, Willseyville (June 16, 1880), Page 14, Line 16; Amanda H. Willsey, age 66; boarder, born NY, father born NY and mother b. NY.

57.  Bible Record of Seneca Howland.

58.  1870 Federal Census, New York, Tioga, Candor, (June 14, 1870).

59.  1880 Federal Census, New York, Tioga, Willseyville (June 16, 1880), page 14.

60.  1860, Census, US, New York, Tioga, Candor, (July 20, 1860), Line 27.

61.  1870 Federal Census, New York, Tioga, Candor, (June 14, 1870), Page 28, Line 19; William Willsey, age 62, Farmer, property value $8,000, personal property $1550, born New York State.

62.  1860, Census, US, New York, Tioga, Candor, (July 20, 1860).

63.  1870 Federal Census, New York, Tioga, Candor, (June 14, 1870).

64.  1860 United States Federal Census > New York > Kings > Brooklyn Ward 19 District 2, Line 30; Sarah A Willsey, age 8, female.

65.  1870 Federal Census, New York, Tioga, Candor, (June 14, 1870), Page 28, Line 22; Sarah A. age 18, born in New York State.

66.  1880 Federal Census, New York, Tioga, Willseyville (June 16, 1880), Page 14, Line 18; Sarah A. Willsey, age 18, boarder, born New York, father born NY, mother born NY.

67.  1900 US Census, New York, Cayuga, Auburn City, Auburn, Ward 6  (Jun 13, 1900), Line 43; Sarah A. Willsey, Sister-in-Law, born Nov `851, age 54, in New York, both parents born New York.

68.  1870 Federal Census, New York, Tioga, Candor, (June 14, 1870).

69.  1880 Federal Census, New York, Tioga, Willseyville (June 16, 1880), Page 14.

70.  Bible Record of Seneca Howland.

71.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 202.

72.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 261-262.

73.  1870 Federal Census, New York, Tompkins, Ithaca, Danby, Page 49 (Jul 8, 1870), Page 49, Line 35; Charles Howland, age 50 is shown as a farmer with real estate valued at $6000.00 and personal property valued at $2000.00.  He Was born in New York.

74.  Bible Record of Seneca Howland.

75.  1870 Federal Census, New York, Tompkins, Ithaca, Danby, Page 49 (Jul 8, 1870), Page 49.

76.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 261-262.

77.  1870 Federal Census, New York, Tompkins, Ithaca, Danby, Page 49 (Jul 8, 1870), Page 49, Line 36, Maria A. is listed as age 44, occupation keeping house and born in Connecticut.

78.  Vital Statistics of Seymour, Conn,, p.48.

79.  1870 Federal Census, New York, Tompkins, Ithaca, Danby, Page 49 (Jul 8, 1870), Page 49.

80.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 262.

81.  1870 Federal Census, New York, Tompkins, Ithaca, Danby, Page 49 (Jul 8, 1870), Line 38, Elizabeth, age 4, born New York.

82.  1870 Federal Census, New York, Tompkins, Ithaca, Danby, Page 49 (Jul 8, 1870).

83.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 262.

84.  Bible Record of Seneca Howland.

85.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 202 & 262.

86.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 262.

87.  Federal Census 1870, Connecticut, Fairfield, Greenwich, 65, Seneca Howland line 4, age 40, M M.E. Minister, Land value at $14,000.00.

88.  Bible Record of Seneca Howland.

89.  Federal Census 1860, Conneciticut, Fairfield, Greenwich, 65.

90.  Federal Census 1850, Connecticut, New Haven, Seymour.

91.  Federal Census 1870, Connecticut, Fairfield, Greenwich, Age 43, female, white, keeping house, born in Conn.

92.  Federal Census 1860, Conneciticut, Fairfield, Greenwich.

93.  Federal Census 1850, Connectcut, New Haven, Seymour.

94.  Federal Census 1850, Connecticut, New Haven, Seymour.

95.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 262.

96.  Collection of Headstone Inscriptions Town of Greenwich, Connecticut, Vol. II, p. 23.

97.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 262.

98.  Federal Census 1870, Connecticut, Fairfield, Greenwich, Age 2, female, white, born in Conn.

99.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 262.

100.  Bible Record of Seneca Howland.

101.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 202 & 262-263.

102.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 262-263.

103.  1870 Federal Census, New York, Tompkins, Ithaca, Danby, Page 49 (Jul 8, 1870), Page 49, Line 30; William Howland is shown as age 43, and employed as farmer.  His real estate is valued at $6,000.00 and his personal property is valued at $2,000.00.  He was born in New York.

104.  Bible Record of Seneca Howland.

105.  1870 Federal Census, New York, Tompkins, Ithaca, Danby, Page 49 (Jul 8, 1870), Page 49.

106.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 263.

107.  1870 Federal Census, New York, Tompkins, Ithaca, Danby, Page 49 (Jul 8, 1870), Page 49, Line 31, Louise, age 43 is employed keeping house.  The census also records that she too was born in New York.

108.  Old Rural Danby Cemetary, grave marker.

109.  1870 Federal Census, Connecticut, Fairfield, Fairfield, Sourthport, Page 4 (Jun 15, 1870).

110.  South Danby Cemetery, South Danby, Tompkins Co., New York.

111.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 263.

112.  South Danby Cemetery, South Danby, Tompkins Co., New York.

113.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 263.

114.  1870 Federal Census, New York, Tompkins, Ithaca, Danby, Page 49 (Jul 8, 1870), Page 49, Line 32, Hattie, age 9, born New York.

115.  Old Rural Danby Cemetary, grave marker.

116.  1870 Federal Census, New York, Tompkins, Ithaca, Danby, Page 49 (Jul 8, 1870), Page 49.

117.  Old Rural Danby Cemetary, grave marker.

118.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 263.

119.  1870 Federal Census, New York, Tompkins, Ithaca, Danby, Page 49 (Jul 8, 1870), Page 49, Line 33; Addie, age 5, born New York.

120.  1900 US Census, New York, Cayuga, Auburn City, Auburn, Ward 6  (Jun 13, 1900), Page 179, Line 44, Addie L. Howland, cousin born May 1865, age 35, born New York both parents born New York, she can read, write and speak English.

121.  Old Rural Danby Cemetary, grave marker.

122.  1900 US Census, New York, Cayuga, Auburn City, Auburn, Ward 6  (Jun 13, 1900), Page 179.

123.  Old Rural Danby Cemetary, grave marker.

124.  Bible Record of Seneca Howland.

125.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 202.

126.  Bible Record of Seneca Howland.

127.  National Genealogical Society Quarterly, Vo. 60, page 299.

128.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 260.

129.  1850 Federal Census, New York, Tompkins, Danby, Roll: M432-605, Page 54, Age 20, born NY.

130.  National Genealogical Society Quarterly, Vol. 60, page 299.

131.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 260.

132.  Interview with Charles Foley.

133.  National Genealogical Society Quarterly, Vol. 60, page 299.

134.  Roger Howland  12/18/99, Interview with Virgil Kennedy.

135.  Hancock Signal.

136.  Roger Howland  12/18/99, Interview with Virgil Kennedy.

137.  Hancock Signal, Wed. Sep 22, 1880.

138.  Hancock Signal.

139.  Roger Howland  12/18/99, Interview with Virgil Kennedy.

140.  National Genealogical Society Quarterly, Vol. 60, page 299.

141.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 260.

142.  1850 Federal Census, New York, Tompkins, Danby, Roll: M432-605, page 54, Seneca Howland, age 16, Born NY, Farmer.

143.  National Genealogical Society Quarterly, Vol. 60, page 299.

144.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 260.

145.  National Genealogical Society Quarterly, Vol. 60, page 299, She is called Eliza Gillespie.

146.  National Genealogical Society Quarterly, Vol. 60, page 299.

147.  Hancock County Democrat,, Thursday, Apr 11, 1889.

148.  National Genealogical Society Quarterly, Vol. 60. page 299.

149.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 260, Said that he had six children but does not name them.

150.  National Genealogical Society Quarterly, Vol. 60, page 299.

151.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 260.

152.  Federal Census 1900, Missouri, Jackson, Kansas City Ward 6, District 50.

153.  1850 Census, Lincoln County, Mo. page 434.

154.  National Genealogical Society Quarterly, Vol. 60, page 299, Called Lucretia Ramsdell in this source.

155.  National Genealogical Society Quarterly, Vol. 60., page 299.

156.  Federal Census 1900, Missouri, Jackson, Kansas City Ward 6, District 50.

157.  1910 Kansas, Jackson Co., Missouri federal census.

158.  1880 Federal Census.

159.  1880 Federal Census, page 139 B, Columbia, Boone, Missouri - Roll 1254676,.

160.  1880 Federal Census.

161.  Federal Census 1900, Missouri, Jackson, Kansas City Ward 6, District 50.

162.  1880 Federal Census.

163.  1910 Kansas, Jackson Co., Missouri federal census.

164.  1880 Federal Census.

165.  National Genealogical Society Quarterly, vol. 60.  page 299.

166.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 260.

167.  Federal Census 1870, New York, Tompkins, Ithaca, Lists Edgar Howland as age 35 and working as a butcher on line 21.

168.  1850 Federal Census, New York, Tompkins, Danby, Roll: M432-605, Page 54, Age 12, born NY.

169.  National Genealogical Society Quarterly, Vol. 60, page 299.

170.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 260.

171.  National Genealogical Society Quarterly, Vol. 60, page 299, Called Nettie Legg [Segg] in this sources.

172.  Federal Census 1870, New York, Tompkins, Ithaca, Nettie, Edgar's wife is listed on line 22.  She is 32 years of age at that time.

173.  National Genealogical Society Quarterly, Vol. 60, page 299.

174.  1900; Census Place: Ithaca Ward 3, Tompkins, New York; Roll: T623 1169; Page: 6B; Enumeration District: 154..

175.  1880; Census Place: Ithaca, Tompkins, New York; Roll: T9_938; Family History Film: 1254938; Page: 263A; Enumeration District: 236; Image: 0529., line 18.

176.  1880; Census Place: Ithaca, Tompkins, New York; Roll: T9_938; Family History Film: 1254938; Page: 263A; Enumeration District: 236; Image: 0529..

177.  1930; Census Place: Ithaca, Tompkins, New York; Roll: 1654; Page:  ; Enumeration District: 24; Image: 379.0..

178.  1880; Census Place: Ithaca, Tompkins, New York; Roll: T9_938; Family History Film: 1254938; Page: 263A; Enumeration District: 236; Image: 0529..

179.  1900; Census Place: Ithaca Ward 3, Tompkins, New York; Roll: T623 1169; Page: 6B; Enumeration District: 154., Line 91.

180.  1880; Census Place: Ithaca, Tompkins, New York; Roll: T9_938; Family History Film: 1254938; Page: 263A; Enumeration District: 236; Image: 0529..

181.  1900; Census Place: Ithaca Ward 3, Tompkins, New York; Roll: T623 1169; Page: 6B; Enumeration District: 154..

182.  National Genealogical Society Quarterly, Vol. 60, page 299, Her middle initial is give as D.

183.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 260.

184.  1850 Federal Census, New York, Tompkins, Danby, Roll: M432-605, Page 54, Age 8, born NY.

185.  National Genealogical Society Quarterly, Vol 60, page 299.

186.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 260.

187.  1880 Federal Census.

188.  National Genealogical Society Quarterly, Vol. 60, page 299.

189.  Federal Census, 1870, New York, Tompkins, Danby, Lewis FerrisEstimated Birth Year:   abt 1838Age in 1870:   32Birthplace:   New YorkHome in 1870:   Danby, Tompkins, New YorkFamily and neighbors:   View ResultsRace:   WhiteGender:   MaleValue of real estate:   View ImagePost Office:   IthacaRoll:   M593_1104Page:   49Image:   101Year:   1870.

190.  National Genealogical Society Quarterly, Vol. 60. page 299.

191.  National Genealogical Society Quarterly, Vol. 60, page 299.

192.  Federal Census 1870, New York, Tompkins, Ithaca.

193.  Year: 1880; Census Place: Danby, Tompkins, New York; Roll: T9_938; Family History Film: 1254938; Page: 46D; Enumeration District: 225; Image: 0095..

194.  Federal Census 1870, New York, Tompkins, Ithaca.

195.  Year: 1880; Census Place: Danby, Tompkins, New York; Roll: T9_938; Family History Film: 1254938; Page: 46D; Enumeration District: 225; Image: 0095..

196.  Year: 1930; Census Place: Ithaca, Tompkins, New York; Roll: 1654; Page:  ; Enumeration District: 32; Image: 725.0..

197.  Year: 1880; Census Place: Danby, Tompkins, New York; Roll: T9_938; Family History Film: 1254938; Page: 46D; Enumeration District: 225; Image: 0095..

198.  Year: 1930; Census Place: Ithaca, Tompkins, New York; Roll: 1654; Page:  ; Enumeration District: 32; Image: 725.0..

199.  U.S. Census > 1920 United States Federal Census > Washington > Lewis > Forest > District 143.

200.  Year: 1930; Census Place: Ithaca, Tompkins, New York; Roll: 1654; Page:  ; Enumeration District: 32; Image: 725.0..

201.  National Genealogical Society Quarterly, Vol. 60, page 299.

202.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 260.

203.  National Genealogical Society Quarterly, Vol. 60, page 299.

204.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 260.

205.  National Genealogical Society Quarterly, Vol. 60, page 299.

206.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 260.

207.  1850 Federal Census, New York, Tompkins, Danby, Roll: M432-605, Page 54, Age 1, Born NY.

208.  1880, Federal Census, Connecticut, Fairfield, Greenwich, District 158 (June 6, 188), Age 31, daughter in law.

209.  1900; Census Place: Greenwich, Fairfield, Connecticut; Roll: T623 133; Page: 6B; Enumeration District: 71., Born 1849, age 57.

210.  National Genealogical Society Quarterly, Vol. 60, page 299.

211.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 260.

212.  National Genealogical Society Quarterly, Vol. 60, page 299.

213.  1880, Federal Census, Connecticut, Fairfield, Greenwich, District 158 (June 6, 188), Age 38.

214.  1900; Census Place: Greenwich, Fairfield, Connecticut; Roll: T623 133; Page: 6B; Enumeration District: 71., Born July 1841, age 58.

215.  National Genealogical Society Quarterly, Vol. 60., page 299.

216.  National Genealogical Society Quarterly, Vol. 60, page 299.

217.  1900; Census Place: Greenwich, Fairfield, Connecticut; Roll: T623 133; Page: 6B; Enumeration District: 71..

218.  1880, Federal Census, Connecticut, Fairfield, Greenwich, District 158 (June 6, 188), Age 8,.

219.  1880, Federal Census, Connecticut, Fairfield, Greenwich, District 158 (June 6, 188).

220.  1880, Federal Census, Connecticut, Fairfield, Greenwich, District 158 (June 6, 188), age 8/12's.

221.  1900; Census Place: Greenwich, Fairfield, Connecticut; Roll: T623 133; Page: 6B; Enumeration District: 71., Age 20.

222.  1880, Federal Census, Connecticut, Fairfield, Greenwich, District 158 (June 6, 188).

223.  1900; Census Place: Greenwich, Fairfield, Connecticut; Roll: T623 133; Page: 6B; Enumeration District: 71..

224.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), p 260.

225.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), p. 260.

226.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), p. 261.

227.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), p261.

228.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), p 261.

229.  Census, US Census, 1900 United States Federal Census, New York, Tompkins, Newfield, District 162, Line 37, Merritt King is not listed.  Emma and her son are listed as living in the household of George Peck and Harriot Adelaide Howland Peck and their children at that time.

230.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), p 261.

231.  Federal Census 1900, New York, Erie, Buffalo Ward 24, District 208.

232.  Year: 1930; Census Place: Buffalo, Erie, New York; Roll: 1433; Page:  ; Enumeration District: 301; Image: 143.0..

233.  Federal Census 1900, New York, Erie, Buffalo Ward 24, District 208.

234.  Year: 1930; Census Place: Buffalo, Erie, New York; Roll: 1433; Page:  ; Enumeration District: 301; Image: 143.0..

235.  Year: 1900; Census Place: Buffalo Ward 24, Erie, New York; Roll: T623 1032; Page: 7A; Enumeration District: 208..

236.  1860, Census, US, New York, Tioga, Candor, (July 20, 1860), Line 29; Mariah Willsey, age 10, female.

237.  1870 Federal Census, New York, Tioga, Candor, (June 14, 1870), Page 28, Line 21; Mariah A., Age 20 female, born New York State.

238.  1880 Federal Census, New York, Tioga, Willseyville (June 16, 1880), Page 14, Line 17; Maria A. Willsey; age 20, daugher to Amanda; keeping house; born New York, father born NY, mother born NY.  It appears that she is the individual married to Archibald Benedict listed two lines below her and is identifed as son-in-law to Amanda.

239.  1900 US Census, New York, Cayuga, Auburn City, Auburn, Ward 6  (Jun 13, 1900), Line 41  Sarah Benedict, wife, born Nov 1849, age 50 in New York, both parents born NY york.

240.  1870 Federal Census, New York, Tioga, Candor, (June 14, 1870).

241.  1860, Census, US, New York, Cortland, Cortlandville (June 18, 1860), Line 22; Archibald W. age 14; born New York State.

242.  1900 US Census, New York, Cayuga, Auburn City, Auburn, Ward 6  (Jun 13, 1900), Page 179, Line 40; Archibald Benedict, born Aug 1845, age 54, born in New York, both parents born New York, employed as a prison guard.

243.  1860, Census, US, New York, Cortland, Cortlandville (June 18, 1860).

244.  1900 US Census, New York, Cayuga, Auburn City, Auburn, Ward 6  (Jun 13, 1900), Page 179, Line 42; Jay W. Benedict, son, born Dec, 1884, New York, currently attending school.  Age 7.

245.  1900 US Census, New York, Cayuga, Auburn City, Auburn, Ward 6  (Jun 13, 1900).

246.  Email from Melissa Pearce 03/05/05, grand daughter of Ella L. Reed.

247.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 262.

248.  1870 Federal Census, New York, Tompkins, Ithaca, Danby, Page 49 (Jul 8, 1870), Page 49, Line 37, Rufus, age 18.  His occupation is shown as: at school.

249.  1870 Federal Census, New York, Tompkins, Ithaca, Danby, Page 49 (Jul 8, 1870).

250.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 262.

251.  1920 Census > U.S. Census > 1920 United States Federal Census, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Ward 27, Line 30; Arthur C. Howland is living at 4118 Baltimore Avenue, Philadelphia with his family at that time.  He is listed as head of household, age 50, born in New York.  His occupation is professor at a college.

252.  1870 Federal Census, New York, Tompkins, Ithaca, Danby, Page 49 (Jul 8, 1870), Page 49, Line 39; Arthur C. Howland, age 6/12's ie 6 months, born New York.

253.  1930, US Federal, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Swarthmore, Roll 2033, Page:  ; Enumeration District; 133; Image: 182.0  (April 11, 1930), Line 84; Arthur S. Howland living at #9 Guernsey Road, age 60, Occupation Professor at University, born New York.  Father born NY, Mother born Connecticut.  The census shows that he was employed and had gone to work the previous day.

254.  1870 Federal Census, New York, Tompkins, Ithaca, Danby, Page 49 (Jul 8, 1870), Page 49.

255.  1880; Census Place: Kings (Brooklyn), New York City-Greater, New York; Roll: T9_856; Family History Film: 1254856; Page: 79D; Enumeration District: 24, Line 25; Emily W. is age 9, daugher and at school.

256.  1920 Census > U.S. Census > 1920 United States Federal Census, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Ward 27, Line 31; Emily B. wife, age 48 born in Connecticut was not reported as employed at that time.

257.  1930, US Federal, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Swarthmore, Roll 2033, Page:  ; Enumeration District; 133; Image: 182.0  (April 11, 1930), Line 85; Emily Berry Howland, wife, age 58, born Connecticut, father born NY and mother born Connecticut.

258.  Howland Family Bible.

259.  1920 Census > U.S. Census > 1920 United States Federal Census, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Ward 27, Line 32; Charles B., son, is reported to have been age 14 at this time.

260.  1930, US Federal, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Swarthmore, Roll 2033, Page:  ; Enumeration District; 133; Image: 182.0  (April 11, 1930), Line 86; Charles B. Howland, son, age 24, born Pennsylvania, father born New York and mother born Connecticut.  Charlie is employed as a lawyer with a law firm and had been employed and gone to work the previous day.

261.  Howland Family Bible.

262.  1930, US Federal, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Swarthmore, Roll 2033, Page:  ; Enumeration District; 133; Image: 182.0  (April 11, 1930).

263.  Chart on the Ellis Family made by Madelene Taws Ellis, Family papers contained in her estate..

264.  Howland Family Bible.

265.  1920 Census > U.S. Census > 1920 United States Federal Census, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Ward 27, Line 33; Arthur L., son, is reported to be 12 years old in this census and a student in school.

266.  1930, US Federal, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Swarthmore, Roll 2033, Page:  ; Enumeration District; 133; Image: 182.0  (April 11, 1930), Line 87; Arthur L. Howland, son, age 22, born in Pennsylvania, father born NY and mother born Conn.,   he was not employed at the time of the census.

267.  Howland Family Bible.

268.  1930, US Federal, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Swarthmore, Roll 2033, Page:  ; Enumeration District; 133; Image: 182.0  (April 11, 1930).

269.  Mary Shaw Green, History of Levi Greene,  (Adrian College Press, Adrian, Michigan, 1944), page 264.

270.  1920 Census > U.S. Census > 1920 United States Federal Census, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Ward 27, Line 34; Emily H., daughter is listed as 8 years old and a student in school.

271.  1930, US Federal, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Swarthmore, Roll 2033, Page:  ; Enumeration District; 133; Image: 182.0  (April 11, 1930), Line 88; Emily H. Howland, daughter, age 18, born in Pennsylvania, father born NY and mother born Conn.  She was not employed at the time of the census.

272.  Howland Family Bible.

273.  1930; Census Place: Ithaca, Tompkins, New York; Roll: 1654; Page:  ; Enumeration District: 24; Image: 379.0..

274.  Obit of Emily Pike, Philadelphia Inquirer 12/10/2002, p. B 11.

275.  Mary Shaw Green, History of Levi Greene,  (Adrian College Press, Adrian, Michigan, 1944), page 264.

276.  Howland Family Bible.

277.  Mary Shaw Green, History of Levi Greene,  (Adrian College Press, Adrian, Michigan, 1944), page 264.

278.  Obit of Emily Pike, Philadelphia Inquirer 12/10/2002, p. B11.

279.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 262.

280.  Federal Census 1870, Connecticut, Fairfield, Greenwich, Age 11, male, white, born in Conn.

281.  Federal Census 1920, New York, Suffolk, Islip, District121.

282.  Federal Census 1920, New York, Suffolk, Islip, District121, Line 82.

283.  Federal Census 1900, New York, Suffolk, Islip, District 766.

284.  Federal Census 1920, New York, Suffolk, Islip, District121.

285.  Federal Census 1900, New York, Suffolk, Islip, District 766.

286.  Federal Census 1920, New York, Queens, Queens, District 280, page 95, Image 11 of 71., Harry Howland appears on line 12, age 40.

287.  Federal Census 1920, New York, Queens, Queens, District 280.

288.  Federal Census 1900, New York, Suffolk, Islip, District 766.

289.  Federal Census 1930, New York, Suffolk, Babylon, District 7, Line 85.

290.  Federal Census 1920, New York, Queens, Queens, District 280, Elizabeth is found on line 13 of the 1920 census.

291.  Federal Census 1930, New York, Suffolk, Babylon, District 7, The 1930 census reports that Elizabeth is 54 at the time it was taken.  She is found one line 86.

292.  Federal Census 1920, New York, Queens, Queens, District 280.

293.  Federal Census 1930, New York, Suffolk, Babylon, District 7.

294.  Federal Census 1930, New York, Suffolk, Babylon, District 7, Line 85.

295.  Federal Census 1920, New York, Queens, Queens, District 280.

296.  Franklyn Howland, Howlands in America,  (Published 1885), page 262.

297.  Federal Census 1870, Connecticut, Fairfield, Greenwich, Age 6, male, white, born in Conn.

298.  Federal Census 1930, New York, Queens, Queens (Districts (1-250) > District 167, They were living in a duplex at 4114 95th Street. Sarah first name with last name Howland is list.  Can not confirm last name from this record.

299.  Federal Census 1900, New York, New York, Manhattan, District 366.

300.  Federal Census 1920, New York, New York, Manhattan, District 842.

301.  Federal Census 1920, New York, New York, Manhattan, District 842, Information is based on Ethel, last name Cairns found in household of Sarah howland, located 366 West 117 Street, Manhattan, New York.

302.  Federal Census 1920, New York, New York, Manhattan, District 842.

303.  Federal Census 1900, New York, New York, Manhattan, District 366.

304.  Federal Census 1930, New York, Queens, Queens (Districts (1-250) > District 167, Walter is list as son in this census at this location.

305.  Federal Census 1900, New York, New York, Manhattan, District 366.

306.  Federal Census 1930, New York, Queens, Queens (Districts (1-250) > District 167.

307.  Federal Census 1920, New York, New York, Manhattan, District 842.

308.  Federal Census 1900, New York, New York, Manhattan, District 366.

309.  Federal Census 1930, New York, Queens, Queens (Districts (1-250) > District 167.

310.  Federal Census 1920, New York, New York, Manhattan, District 842.

311.  Federal Census 1930, New York, Queens, Queens (Districts (1-250) > District 167.

312.  Federal Census 1920, New York, New York, Manhattan, District 842.

 

This family file was sent into us by Roger Howland.  email: Roger.Howland@ucop.edu
Thank you Roger for sharing your family records with the Tompkins Co., NYGenWeb site.
 
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