COLONEL ROOSEVELT IS GIVEN BIG OVATION HERE
COLONEL ROOSEVELT SPEAKS IN NEWFIELD
PICNICS ON IRISH HILL

THE ITHACA DAILY JOURNAL MONDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 24, 1910

COLONEL ROOSEVELT IS GIVEN BIG OVATION HERE
Speaks at Ithaca Hotel before Leaving on Auto Trip
Tells of inconsistency of Dix's Declaration that he was not in Wall Paper Trust by
Quoting Important Decision on Supreme Courts -
Tells what Candidate Stimson Really is -
Big Demonstration in Newfield.

Traffic was blocked on State Street at 9 o'clock this morning while Colonel Theodore Roosevelt spoke from a balcony of the New Ithaca Hotel, so great was the crowd that turned out to hear the distinguished speaker. There was a bit demonstration when the speaker stepped to the front of the balcony and he continued to receive applause during his speech, which was short but pointed, and directed mostly to Nominee Dix, whose connection with the Standard Wall Paper Trust was brought out in the decision of the United States Supreme court.

The greatest demonstration came after the speech, however, when the corridors of the hotel became packed with surging humanity anxious to get near the Colonel. Cheer after cheer went up as he came down the stairway and his party forced a way to the front of the hotel, where automobiles were waiting to take the party on its trip through the southern part of Tompkins County and through Tioga County to inspect the so-called abandoned farm district.

Colonel Roosevelt had breakfasted with Dean Bailey at his home in Sage Place, after arriving here at 7 o'clock this morning from New York. It was nearly 9 o'clock when he was driven to the hotel and he at once went to the hotel parlors where he me Dr. Andrew D. White, who was an interested listener to his speech on the balcony. Dean L.H. Bailey was also present.

By this time the streets were packed with people from the Rumsey hardware store to the Lehigh Valley Railroad City Ticket Office. Many Cornell students were gathered in the middle of the street and they sent up a yell. Col. Roosevelt received another cheer when he opened by saying that he "gathered that there were some Cornell students present." He said he recognized in the cheering and yell "the suggestion of the football and other fields of higher education" and drew a hearty laugh.

A street car then passed and he said, "Let's wait a minute I don't want to talk against industry." Another amusing incident took place during his address when the hotel porter tried to raise an electric wire which ran across the front of the balcony in front of the colonel's face. The porter failed in his efforts and Colonel Roosevelt placed both hands on the wire and proceeded to talk over it. Col. Roosevelt showed his fearlessness when Congressman Dwight came forward and warned him that the wire might be a live one. The Colonel turned and said: "Well I am used to being shot; I will take chance," and proceeded to hang on the wire and talk.

When he finished speaking there was a large crowd in the upperhall to greet him. A short reception was held and two or three mothers had their children ready to grasp the hand of the former president.

Coach Charles E. Courtney was present and the Colonel greeted him with, "This is a pleasure; I am jolly glad to meet you Mr. Courtney." He then asked if TenEyck was still at the head of the Syracuse crews. In coming down the stairs coach Courtney was in front of Col. Roosevelt. A cheer went up for Roosevelt who sniffed and gestured to Coach Courtney, patting him on the back, and the students seeing the pleasantry, sent up a deafening cheer. Coach Courtney modestly made his way into the crowd and disappeared. It was with some difficulty that the guest and his party made its way out of the hotel and into the automobile. As it left Col. Roosevelt arose and acknowledged the shouts that followed him. The automobiles made their way down North Aurora Street.

Colonel Roosevelt said, in part: .....Roosevelt Speech

At the breakfast this morning at Dean Bailey's house, besides col. Roosevelt were Congressman John W. Dwight, Congressman Cocks of Long Island; Editor Howland of The Outlook, and government Expert Newcomb. These men comprised the automobile party which left for Newfield, followed by two automobile loads of New York newspaper men. After leaving Newfield short stops were made in Tioga county and the tour was scheduled to end in Binghamton to-night, where Colonel Roosevelt will give a political address.

COLONEL ROOSEVELT SPEAKS IN NEWFIELD

THE ITHACA DAILY JOURNAL MONDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 24, 1910
(Special dispatch to the Ithaca Journal)

Newfield Oct. 24 - Colonel Roosevelt and his party arrived here at 11 o'clock. There was a big crowd to greet him. Stores were decorated with flags and the Newfield band was out. He received a big ovation as he stepped onto the balcony of the hotel to speak to the crowd that had gathered.

His address was along agricultural lines. He urged the people to use modern implements and methods and make an effort to bring up their lands to their former productiveness. He said:

"I don't want to see the farmer sag behind. I want to see him take his place, not only with leading professions, but at the top where he belongs."

He told of C.A. Schmidt who came to Connecticut Hill to take up one of the abandoned farms, and is now getting good results and making a good living. The Colonel then went into a lecture on good citizenship telling the people that if they were to get anything in life they had to do their work well. He advised fathers and mothers to bring up their children, not to avoid work, but to do work. The Roosevelt party stopped at two of the so-called abandoned farms where Government Expert Newcombe, a member of the party, explained how the farms had been improved in the past two years, after they had been abandoned. The Colonel said the task was great and that the work in this region had begun.

PICNICS ON IRISH HILL

THE ITHACA DAILY JOURNAL MONDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 24, 1910
(Special dispatch to the Ithaca Journal)

Owego Oct. 24 - Col. Roosevelt and his party attended a picnic on Irish Hill south of Newfield, this afternoon and then proceeded to this village where he arrived at 2:30. Irish Hill is one of the notable abandoned farm districts. A lunch was served by farmers in the vicinity, stops were made in Van Etten, Spencer and Candor, where talks on agricultural topics were made by Col. Roosevelt from his automobile. In this village he gave a similar address from a hotel balcony.


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